Newsletter No .

Newsletter No. 68 (EN)

Latest Developments in the Acquisition of Land by Foreigners in Thailand

 

 

With Regulation Mor. Tor. 015/ Vor 1562, dated 15 May 20061, the Ministry of Interior/the Land Department has implemented certain changes in their practice concerning the acquisition of Land by juristic persons, which have foreigners as shareholders or directors.

 

 

In principal, acquisition of land by foreigners is very restricted2. However, over the last couple of years various practices were established in order to enable foreigners to invest into and control property in Thailand.

 

 

The most common practice for foreigners to acquire land outside of industrial areas is the setup of a Thai legal entity, which means, that at least 51% of the shares are to be held by Thai nationals. Due to the regulations of the Land Act, for the acquisition of land foreign shareholder ship is to be decreased to 39% and, additionally, the majority shareholders have to be Thai nationals. In order to enable the foreigner to control the company, Thai nationals act as trustees in such companies. The funds for the whole set up mostly come from foreign investors only.

 

 

Even in the past, this practice of “Buying” land was not really recommendable as the use of trustees is prohibited under the Thai Laws. However, no further investigation was initiated by the Land Department as long as the above formal criteria were met.

 

 

With the introduction of the Regulation Mor Tor 015/ Vor 1562, this conventional practice of acquiring land will cause further investigation of the Land Department and

See attachment

 

there are only few exceptions to legally acquire land as a foreigner, such as BOI promotion, land within an industrial estates etc.

 

 

Newsletter No. 68 (EN)

Latest Developments in the Acquisition of Land by Foreigners in Thailand

 

might even prevent foreigners from being able to acquire land at all, at least under the “ old” schemes.

 

 

According to the new instructions which have now come into force and are already in use, Thai shareholders have to prove their capability to finance such acquisition by themselves. This applies as soon as foreigners are appearing as shareholders, or directors of such a land acquiring corporation, or if other circumstances lead to the conclusion that the land is acquired for the benefit of a foreigner. In such cases, the officer of the Land Department is advised to investigate the source of income of the Thai shareholders used to buy the shares in that corporation, e.g. by requiring to submit evidence in respect to their current profession and monthly salary or others.

 

 

Compared to the old rules, the new regulations accommodate a wide and unpredictable range of possibilities, to prevent the acquisition of land to the Thai authorities. For new acquisitions of land some authorities already started to make use of the new regulation and rejected formally correct applications.

 

 

Although there is currently no indication that existing companies holding/owning land are investigated, the new regulation further complicates real estate investments in Thailand. It will therefore be even more essential to carefully structure real estate deals in order to avoid problems with the authorities within the Transfer Act. There are still some legal ways to enable foreigners to secure their investments (live long lease, off-shore /onshore investments and some others) if deals are carefully structured and if firms are entrusted to work on these issues which are able and willing to work diligent and if the investor is willing to follow not always the cheapest advice.

 

 

Newsletter No. 68 (EN)

Latest Developments in the Acquisition of Land by Foreigners in Thailand

 

 

Request for the acquisition of land by foreigners

 

 

The Ministerial Regulation of Mor. Tor. 0515/ Vor 1562, dated 15 May 2006

 

 

 

 

 

Subject:

 

The request for the acquisition of land by foreigners

To

:

Provincial Governor

 

 

 

 

 

Reference

 

The letter from Ministerial of Internal, Mor Thor 0515/Vor 2657, dated 5 August 2003 The letter from land Department, Mor Thor 0515/Vor 13725, dated 4 May 2003

 

The letter from land Department, Mor Thor 0515/Vor 12013, dated 26 April 2006

 

 

 

 

 

Following to the Regulation Mor. Tor. 0515/ Vor 1562, dated 15 May 2006, Ministry of Interior/the Land Department implements certain changes in their practice concerning the acquisition of land by a juristic person, which has a foreigner as a shareholder.

 

 

The Ministry of Interior received reports stating that there were foreigners who cooperated with Thai nationals or hired Thai nationals to establish a Thai Company for the purpose of purchasing and selling of immovable properties. At first, the company declared that it bought the house and land to be used as a company office or residential premises. Later on, the company changed its plan to dividing and selling the portion of such land to foreigners

 

Newsletter No. 68 (EN)

Latest Developments in the Acquisition of Land by Foreigners in Thailand

 

 

The Ministry of Interior has considered such act as unlawful. Thus, to prevent such misuse of law by purchasing land for the benefits of foreigners pursuant to the Section 74 Paragraph 2 of the Land Code, additional instruction should be imposed as following:

 

 

In case that a limited company, a limited partnership or a registered partnership applies for the acquisition of land for the purpose of carrying on trade or business in immovable properties, if it is obvious that such entity has a foreigner acting as a shareholder or a director of such entity or the officer of the Land Department has a justified reason to believe that Thai persons in that company act as representatives of a foreigner, the officer shall investigate the source of income used to buy the shares in that company by requiring all Thai shareholders to submit evidence in respect to their current profession, and their monthly salary. This does not apply to any legal entities such as public companies or other kinds of juristic persons, which are granted the right to acquire land according to the law, such as the section 27 of the Investment Promotion Act B.E 2520, the section 44 of the Industrial Estate Authority of Thailand

 

 

Act B.E 2522, or property funds or financial institutions organized by a specific law of Thailand, and insurance companies.

 

In case that any Thai shareholder claims that he or she has borrowed money from other persons, the officer of the Land Department has to require this Thai shareholder to send the written evidence of the loan agreement. After investigation, if the officer has reason to believe that the registration is accomplished for the misuse of law or this person buys land for the benefit of foreigners according to the section 74 Paragraph 2 of the Land Code, the officer is required to conduct additional investigation and then

 

Newsletter No. 68 (EN)

Latest Developments in the Acquisition of Land by Foreigners in Thailand

 

 

report all information to the Land Department for further instruction from the Minister.

 

Notify for the acknowledgement and instruct the officer to abide this instruction.

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners Co., Ltd. always pays greatest attention on updating the information provided in this newsletter we cannot take responsibility for the topicality, completeness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

 

 

 

 

 

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius for Royalties and others

 

August 2006

 

 

 

 

 

Alle Rechte vorbehalten © Lorenz & Partners 2006


Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

  1. Einführung

 

Die Republik Mauritius hat 1,240 Millionen Einwohner1 und liegt östlich von Afrika im Indischen Ozean. Im Westen des Staates befinden sich Madagaskar (ca. 900 km entfernt) sowie La Réunion (ca. 200 km entfernt). Nach Indien sind es ungefähr 4000 km (in nordöstlicher Richtung). Zum mauritianischen Staatsgebiet gehören viele kleinere Inseln wie zum Beispiel St. Brandon, Rodrigues und die Agalega-Inseln. Mauritius, La Réunion und Rodrigues gehören zu den Maskare-nen.

 

In der Absicht den Inselstaat zu einem regionalen Finanzzentrum auszubauen, führte Mauritius 1992 seine Offshore Business Gesetze ein. Diese Maßnahme er-wies sich als erfolgreich, da nun der Finanzsektor – neben der Zucker-, Textil-und Tourismusindustrie – die vierte wirtschaftliche Stütze des Landes darstellt.

 

Die Hauptstadt der Republik Mauritius ist Port Louis. Mit ca. 170.000 Einwoh-nern ist sie die größte Stadt des Landes und zugleich auch das wirtschaftliche und kulturelle Zentrum der Republik.

1  Word Factbook Mauritius (Stand: 07/2006): https://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/geos/mp.html

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Nach der Unabhängigkeit von Großbritannien im Jahr 1968 blieb die politische und wirtschaftliche Lage auf Mauritius stabil. Der Inselstaat wurde daher für aus-ländische Investoren interessant. – Heute hat die Republik Mauritius eines der höchsten Pro-Kopf-Einkommens Afrikas2 (siehe Grafik).

 

 

Mauritius kann eine stabile Infrastruktur, umfangreiche Kommunikationseinrich-tungen, einen sich stark entwickelnden Freihafen, eine wirtschaftsorientierte Re-gierung sowie eine Vielzahl an erfahrenen Experten für die wachsenden Belange im Bereich des Offshore Business vorweisen.

 

Die höchste Revisionsinstanz der Republik Mauritius ist nach britischer Tradi-tion noch immer der Justizausschuss des Privy Council in London.

2  durchschnittliches Einkommen pro Jahr

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

  1. Rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen

 

 

2.1 Einführung

 

Bis 2001 wurden Gesellschaften auf Mauritius gemäß dem Companies Act aus dem Jahr 1984 gegründet. Dieses Gesetz folgte den Vorgaben des britischen Companies Act von 1948. Danach konnten Gesellschaften entweder als ‚limited by shares’, als ‚limited by guarantee’ oder als ‚unlimited’ gegründet werden. Hatte das Registrar of Companies den Namen einer Gesellschaft genehmigt, wurde die Gesellschaft durch die Hinterlegung der Gründungsurkunde bei einem Notar eingetragen. Die Firmenbücher und Gesellschaftsaufzeichnungen mussten bei einer lokalen registrierten Geschäftsstelle, die auch durch eine Kanzlei unter-halten werden konnte, aufbewahrt werden. Die geprüften Jahresabschlüsse und -berichte waren dem Registrar of Companies vorzulegen. Ferner mussten min-destens zwei Direktoren und ein Geschäftsführer ihren Wohnsitz auf Mauritius nachweisen können.

 

Die Errichtung einer Gesellschaft dauerte in der Regel zwei bis drei Wochen. Das Stammkapital betrug mindestens 25.000 Mauritius-Rupien (MR), das ent-spricht ca. 635 Euro.

 

Der Höhe des Gesellschaftskapitals entsprechend waren jährlich Eintragungsge-bühren in Höhe von 4.000 bis 8.000 MR (ca. 100 bis 200 Euro) zu zahlen.

 

Die gesetzlichen Rahmenbedingungen wurden im Jahr 2001 geändert. Mit Aus-nahme der Insolvenzbestimmungen und den Regelungen über die Publikums-gesellschaften, die bis zum Erlass eigener Gesetze im Jahr 2004 in Kraft blieben, wurde ein Großteil des Companies Act aus dem Jahr 1984 ersetzt.

 

Die Gründung und das Betreiben von Offshore und internationalen Gesell-schaften – ursprünglich im International Business Companies Act von 1994 ge-regelt – wurden in den Companies Act (2001) miteinbezogen. Dazu gehören die beiden folgenden Gesellschaftsformen:

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Global Business Licence Company 1 (GBL1)

 

Global Business Licence Company 2 (GBL2)

 

 

2.2 Die mauritianische (Auslands-)Gesellschaft

 

Eine im Ausland gegründete Gesellschaft kann sich nun also auf Mauritius re-gistrieren lassen. Sie wird weitgehend als eine ‚Mauritius-Gesellschaft’ anerkannt. Nach altem mauritianischen Recht war vor allem die Form der Zweigniederlas-sung verbreitet.

 

Beim Registrar of Companies sind nun folgende Dokumente einzureichen:

 

die notarielle Eintragungsurkunde;

 

die Satzung;

 

die Direktorenliste;

 

die Inhalte der lokalen Direktorenbefugnisse;

 

die Einzelheiten über das registrierte Büro auf Mauritius;

 

die Namen von mindestens zwei Personen, die einen Wohnsitz auf Mauritius vorweisen können und die autorisiert sind, im Namen der Gesellschaft auf Mauritius zu handeln, sowie deren Anmeldung.

 

 

Die Bilanzabschlüsse müssen innerhalb von drei Monaten nach der ordentlichen Gesellschafterversammlung beim Registrar of Companies eingereicht werden. Die vollständige oder teilweise Beteiligung von Ausländern an einer mauritiani-schen Auslandsgesellschaft bedarf der besonderen Genehmigung durch das Bü-ro des Premierministers.

 

Die Genehmigung erfolgt jedoch nicht in jedem Fall. Geschäftsaktivitäten einer Gesellschaft, die z.B. in direkter Konkurrenz zu Aktivitäten mauritianischer Ge-sellschaften stehen, führen dazu, dass die Gesellschaft nicht zugelassen wird.

 

Der Inhalt des vorliegenden Newsletters beschäftigt sich im Weiteren ausschließ-lich mit den GBL1 und GBL2 Gesellschaften.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

2.2.1 Die GBL1 Gesellschaft (Offshore Gesellschaft)

 

Die als Offshore bekannte Gesellschaft wurde durch die GBL1 Gesellschaft ersetzt. Sie wird nun nach dem Companies Act (2001) und dem Financial Ser-vices Development Act (2001) geregelt.

 

Der Offshore Business Activities Act aus dem Jahr 1992 enthielt einen Katalog von Aktivitäten, die Offshore Gesellschaften durchführen durften. Dieser Kata-log gilt nach wie vor. Demnach können GBL1 Gesellschaften folgende Aktivi-täten durchführen:

Flugzeugleasing und -finanzierung;

 

internationale Beratungsleistungen;

 

internationale Beschäftigungsdienstleistungen;

 

internationale Finanzdienstleistungen;

 

internationales Franchising und internationale Lizenzierung;

 

internationale Vermögensverwaltung;

 

internationaler Technologieservice einschließlich Datenverarbeitung;

 

internationale Handelsgeschäfte;

 

Offshore Transaktionen;

 

Offshore Fondsverwaltung einschließlich Pensionsfonds;

 

Offshore Versicherungstransaktionen;

 

Speditionsgeschäfte einschließlich Schiffsmanagement;

 

das Betreiben eines Headquarters.

 

 

Nach dem Financial Services Development Act aus dem Jahr 2001 wird eine GBL1 Gesellschaft als eine Gesellschaft, die in speziellen globalen Geschäftsfel-dern tätig ist und von Mauritius aus mit ausschließlich ausländischem Personal betrieben wird, definiert. Gemäß dem Financial Services Development Act (2001) gelten für eine GBL1 Gesellschaft folgende Regelungen:

 

Eine GBL1 Gesellschaft kann lokal eingetragen sein oder als Niederlassung einer ausländischen Gesellschaft geführt werden.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Alle Geschäftsaktivitäten sind in einer anderen Währung als der mauritiani-schen Rupie abzuwickeln. Geschäfte des täglichen Lebens sind davon nicht betroffen.

Eine GBL1 Gesellschaft darf weder innerhalb der Republik Mauritius noch mit mauritianischen Bürgern Geschäftstätigkeiten durchführen. Von dieser Regelung ausgenommen sind die Inanspruchnahme von professioneller Be-ratung, die Beschäftigung lokaler Arbeitskräfte sowie die Anmietung von Bürokapazitäten.

 

Da die GBL1 Gesellschaft als Steuersubjekt der Republik Mauritius angesehen wird, genießt sie auch die Vorteile der zahlreichen Doppelbesteuerungsabkom-men (DBA), die der Inselstaat mit anderen Staaten abschloss.

 

Sind alle notwendigen Unterlagen mit dem Antrag auf die Eintragung der Gesell-schaft beim Registrar of Companies eingereicht, dauert der Genehmigungspro-zess inklusive Eintragung ca. zwei bis drei Wochen. Die Bearbeitungsgebühr beträgt 500 US-Dollar; die jährliche Lizenzgebühr 1.500 US-Dollar.

 

 

2.2.2 Die GBL2 Gesellschaft (Internationale Gesellschaft)

 

Die GBL2 Gesellschaft ersetzte die Gesellschaftsform der International Com-pany. Sie wurde durch den International Companies Act aus dem Jahr 1994 erst-mals eingeführt und wird nun in dem Companies Act (2001) geregelt.

 

Eine GBL2 Gesellschaft ist in allen möglichen Rechtsformen zulässig. Im Ge-gensatz zur Offshore Gesellschaft war es einer International Company erlaubt, Inhaberaktien auszugeben. Diese Regelung wurde durch das neue Gesetz zwar aufgehoben, jedoch kann nun die Beteiligungsstruktur flexibler ausgestaltet wer-den:

 

Ein Minimum an Stammkapital ist nicht mehr erforderlich, auch wenn ein Anteil ausgegeben und bezahlt werden muss.

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Namensaktien und andere Arten von Anteilen (z.B. Vorzugsaktien) sind er-laubt.

 

Anteile können mit oder ohne Nennwert ausgegeben werden.

 

Rückkaufbare Vorzugsaktien können ausgegeben werden.

 

Es sind nur noch ein Anteilseigner und ein Geschäftsführer notwendig.

 

 

Eine GBL2 Gesellschaft wird als eine gebietsfremde Körperschaft angesehen. Aus diesem Grund genießt sie nicht die Vorteile der mauritianischen DBA. Auch die Nutzung des Freihafens der Republik ist nicht möglich. Ferner dürfen mau-ritianische Staatsbürger keine Anteile an einer GBL2 Gesellschaft besitzen. Die Rechte einer GBL2 Gesellschaft sind vielfach eingeschränkt. Folgende Akti-vitäten sind nicht möglich:

 

die Kapitalbeschaffung durch Zeichnung öffentlicher Anteile;

 

die Durchführung von Bank- und Versicherungsgeschäften;

 

der Besitz von Land auf Mauritius;

 

der Besitz oder die Verwaltung eines genossenschaftlichen Investment Fonds;

 

das Anbieten von ‚Strohmann-’ und Treuhänderdiensten für mehr als drei Trusts.

 

GBL2 Gesellschaften sind nicht verpflichtet, Jahresabschlüsse vorzulegen. Die Vertraulichkeit kann durch benannte Geschäftsführer und Anteilseigner gewähr-leistet werden.

 

Der Genehmigungsprozess für eine GBL2 Gesellschaft inklusive Eintragung dauert in der Regel 24 bis 48 Stunden. Eine Bearbeitungsgebühr fällt nicht an. Die jährlichen Lizenzgebühren betragen 265 US-Dollar.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

  1. Die steuerliche Behandlung von Offshore Gesellschaften

 

 

3.1 Die GBL1 Gesellschaft

 

Da eine GBL1 Gesellschaft wie eine lokale Gesellschaft behandelt wird, hat sie 15% Körperschaftssteuer (0%, wenn sie vor dem 1. Juli 1998 als juristische Person eingetragen war) zu zahlen. Hierauf kann sich die Gesellschaft entweder tatsächlich gezahlte ausländische Ertragssteuern oder einen fiktiven ausländi-schen Steuersatz in Höhe von 80% auf den Körperschaftssteuersatz anrechnen lassen. Im Ergebnis liegt dann der tatsächliche maximale Steuersatz bei 3%.

 

Zu versteuerndes Einkommen:

 

./.

Körperschaftssteuer

15%

./.

fiktiver ausländischer Steuersatz

80%

=

12%

(80% von 15%)

 

15% – 12%

 

3% maximaler Steuersatz

 

 

Es gibt keine Kapitalertragssteuer auf gezahlte Dividenden oder Zinsen. Es gibt keine Vorschriften für Quellensteuern und daher auch keine Steuern auf Ver-äußerungsgewinne (z.B. wenn ein ausländischer Investor seine Anteile mit Ge-winn verkauft). In der gleichen Weise unterliegen auch Kapitalerträge, die die GBL1 Gesellschaft durch die Veräußerung eigener Anteile an eine ausländische Gesellschaft erwirtschaftet, nicht der mauritianischen Steuer. Auch sind GBL1 Gesellschaften von der Stempelsteuer sowie von der Grunderwerbssteuer ausge-nommen. Ausländische Angestellte von Offshore Gesellschaften zahlen die Hälfte des normalen Einkommenssteuersatzes. Pro Gesellschaft können zwei Kraftfahrzeuge für Mitarbeiter sowie Einrichtungsgegenstände ohne Einfuhrzoll nach Mauritius eingeführt werden.

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Übersicht über den Einkommenssteuersatz (seit Juli 2006)3:

 

 

Einkommen

normaler Steuersatz

halber Steuersatz

0 – 500.000 MR / 0 –

15 %

7,5 %

< 500.000 MR / <

22,5 %

11,25 %

 

 

Beispiel:

 

Jahreseinkommen eines ausländischen Angestellten in Höhe von 100.000 Euro:

 

./.

normaler Steuersatz

22,5%

=

22.500 Euro

oder

./.

halber Steuersatz

11, 25%

=

11.250 Euro

 

 

Einkommen von 77.500 Euro oder 88.750 Euro nach Abzug der Steuern

 

 

 

Wie schon erwähnt, genießen GBL1 Gesellschaften die Vorzüge der mauritiani-schen DBA. Allerdings müssen sie hierzu ein Tax Residency Certificate besitzen. Dieses wird auf jährlicher Basis und auf bestimmte DBA bezugnehmend ausgestellt. Diese DBA müssen bei Beantragung angeführt werden. Des Weiteren muss am Tage der Beantragung eines solchen Tax Residency Certificate sichergestellt sein, dass die Jahresabschlüsse der Rechnungsperioden pünktlich zum Ende des fiskalen Jahres vorliegen. Nach Prüfung der Voraussetzungen und Zahlung der jährlichen Registrierungsgebühr in Höhe von 1.500 US-Dollar und bei Vollständigkeit der erforderlichen Dokumente, dauert es in der Regel eine Woche bis das Tax Residency Certificate ausgestellt ist.

 

 

Eine GBL1 Gesellschaft muss zwar Jahresabschlüsse vorlegen, die Einreichung eines Jahresberichts ist jedoch nicht erforderlich.

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Offshore Banken, firmeneigene Versicherer und Offshore Investment Fonds werden wie GBL1 Gesellschaften besteuert. Das gleiche gilt für GBL1 Gesell-schaften, die Schiffe im mauritianischen Schiffsregister eintrugen.

 

 

3.2 Die GBL2 Gesellschaft

 

Eine GBL2 Gesellschaft – offiziell als ‚Ausnahme’ der GBL1 Gesellschaft zuge-ordnet – genießt die gleichen Steuervorteile wie die GBL1 Gesellschaft. Da die GBL2 Gesellschaft allerdings als eine gebietsfremde Gesellschaft angesehen wird, bleiben ihr die Vorzüge der DBA verwehrt.

 

Eine bestehende GBL2 Gesellschaft hat aber die Möglichkeit, die Lizenz für eine Gesellschaft der Kategorie 1 zu beantragen und sich zu einer GBL1 Gesellschaft umzuformen.

 

Wenn zum Beispiel eine Gesellschaft weiß, dass sich ihre Geschäftsaktivitäten in der Zukunft ändern werden, kann sie zunächst als GBL2 Gesellschaft auftreten und so steuerfrei agieren. Wenn sie dann die Vorzüge der DBA benötigt, kann sie die Umformung in eine GBL1 Gesellschaft vornehmen.

 

Ferner kann eine GBL2 Gesellschaft zur Reduzierung ihrer gesamten Steuer-pflicht eine GBL1 Gesellschaft gründen (siehe Beispielstrukturen, Seite 12ff). Die Möglichkeit, eine Business-Lizenz umzuwandeln, bietet demnach einige Be-sonderheiten und Vorteile.

 

 

 

 

  1. Steuerabkommen

 

Mauritius wurde lange Zeit als ein wichtiger Kanal für ausländische Direktinves-titionen nach Indien und südostasiatische Länder betrachtet. Das 1983 mit In-dien geschlossene DBA wird als ‚Rückgrat’ der speziellen Beziehung beider Länder angesehen. Im Falle einer Direkinvestition und anschliessenden Veräußerung in Indien würden je nach Dauer des Engagements 20-40 % Steuern von Indien erhoben werden. Hierin ist der Vorteil von Mauritius sehr deutlich zu

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

erkennen. In diesem Falle würde das DBA zwischen Indien und Mauritius vorsehen, dass der Veräußerungsgewinn vollkommen steuerfrei ist. Das Besteuerungsrecht wird laut DBA Mauritius zugewiesen und dieses sieht keine Steuer auf Veräußerungsgewinne vor. Vergleichbare Regelungen sind auch für die DBA mit Singapur, Zypern und den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten vorgesehen.

 

Es ist nur ein Teil einer breiten Palette von ähnlichen Abkommen, die die Regierung von Mauritius mit anderen Staaten zur Vermeidung einer Doppelbesteuerung abschloss. Alle DBA der Republik Mauritius kamen auf der Grundlage des OECD-Musterabkommens4 zustande. Derzeit unterhält Mauritius mit 32 Staaten ein Abkommen zur Vermeidung einer Doppelbesteue-rung (siehe Anhang 1, Seite 16).

 

 

Das DBA mit Indonesien wurde im Januar 2005 beendet, nachdem die indone-sische Regierung im Jahr 2004 die Beendigung des Abkommens bekannt gab. Mit weiteren acht Staaten wurden bereits DBA geschlossen. Sie müssen aber noch ratifiziert werden (siehe Anhang 2, Seite 17).Darüber hinaus verhandelt Mauritius mit fünf weiteren Staaten über DBA (siehe Anhang 2, Seite 17).

 

1994 schlossen Mauritius und die Volksrepublik China ein umfassendes Ab-kommen zur Vermeidung der Doppelbesteuerung. Als Ergebnis genießen chi-nesische Unternehmen, die mauritianische Holding-Strukturen aufweisen, eine Vielzahl von geminderten Steuersätzen – insbesondere im Bereich der Quellen-steuer auf Lizenzzahlungen.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Auf Grund der Vielzahl ähnlicher, mit anderen Staaten geschlossen Abkommen, bietet sich Mauritius als Standort für komplexe Holding-Strukturen sowie für Lizenzzahlungen an.

 

 

 

 

  1. Beispielstrukturen

 

Mauritianische Gesellschaftsstrukturen können für Termingeschäfte, aber auch für Holding-Strukturen von Unternehmungen, deren wirtschaftlicher Fokus auf China gerichtet ist, genutzt werden. Verglichen mit anderen Offshore Ländern wie z.B. Hong Kong sind diese Strukturen jedoch in Bezug auf Kosten und Steu-ern nicht besonders wettbewerbsfähig.

 

Für Geschäftstätigkeiten wie z.B. den Erwerb von Gütern in China, die dann weltweit verkauft werden sollen, kann man auf Mauritius zwischen einer GBL1 oder GBL2 Gesellschaft wählen. Bei einer GBL2 Gesellschaft fallen zwar keine Steuern auf den Gewinn an. Dennoch erachten es viele Firmen als zu schwierig, ihre Produkte durch eine International Business Company an Kunden zu ver-kaufen, da der Wirtschaftsstandort Mauritius nicht das Ansehen wie beispiels-weise der Wirtschaftsstandort Hong Kong genießt.

 

Mit einer GBL1 Gesellschaft können Vorteile aus dem DBA mit China genutzt werden, v.a. wenn das Unternehmen in China keine Betriebsstätte unterhält. Der Steuersatz ist jedoch mit 3% höher als z.B. in Hong Kong, wo für Offshore ge-nerierte Gewinne keine Steuern anfallen.

Die zusätzlichen Kosten für Geschäftsführer sowie für andere Voraussetzungen, um sich für eine Lizenz der Kategorie 1 auf Mauritius zu qualifizieren, sind wei-tere Kriterien, die die Wirtschaftlichkeit einer solchen Struktur verringern.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

triebsstätte zu unterhalten. Die Einnahmen einer solchen mauritianischen Ge-sellschaft (oder Einzelperson) aus in China erbrachten Dienst- oder technischen Serviceleistungen werden nur auf Mauritius besteuert. Der maximale Steuersatz einer GBL1 Gesellschaft liegt hier nur bei 3% – im Gegensatz etwa zu Hong Kong. In Hong Kong hängt der Steuersatz davon ab, ob die Tätigkeit durch eine Gesellschaft oder durch eine Einzelperson durchgeführt wurde. Er liegt bei 16% bzw. 17,5%.

 

Eine GBL1 Gesellschaftsstruktur wird jedoch erst bei komplizierteren Ge-schäftsmodellen interessant, die sich über zahlreiche andere Rechtsordnungen erstrecken und dadurch mehrere DBA der Republik Mauritius nutzen.

 

Beispiel:

 

Eine Gesellschaft hält Urheberrechte, die sie an mehrere asiatische Staaten li-zenzieren will. Die Muttergesellschaft gründet zunächst eine GBL1 Gesellschaft auf Mauritius, die diese Urheberrechte besitzt. Im Weiteren erwartet sie die Rückflüsse der Lizenzgebühren aus den verschiedenen Staaten. Wenn nun die mauritianische Gesellschaft das Tax Residence Certificate besitzt, kann sie von den Vorteilen der DBA profitieren, die günstige Quellensteuersätze bieten. Für Singapur wird die Quellensteuer bei Zahlung von Lizenzgebühren nach Mau-ritius sogar erlassen. Die jeweiligen Quellensteuersätze minimieren sich unter dem Schutz des jeweiligen DBAs, was zu höheren Nettoeinnahmen des Lizenz-gebers führt.

 

Auf Mauritius wird dieses Einkommen abzüglich der Unterhaltungskosten für die Gesellschaft und anderer relevanter Operationskosten mit einem effektiven Steuersatz von maximal 3% besteuert.

 

Je nach wirtschaftlichem Betätigungsfeld sowie potentiellen Steuereinsparungen kann die Gesellschaft aber auch die Gründung einer GBL2 Gesellschaft in Er-wägung ziehen.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

 

 

Beispiel:

 

Die mauritianische GBL2 Gesellschaft ist rechtlich im Besitz der Urheberrechte und lizenziert sie an eine GBL1 Tochtergesellschaft. Die GBL1 Gesellschaft wird dann als Unterlizenzierer geschäftlich tätig. Ihr zu versteuerndes Ein-kommen könnte die Kosten für die Oberlizenzgebühren decken, die sie an ihre GBL2 Muttergesellschaft zahlen müsste. Die GBL2 Gesellschaft hätte demnach kein zu versteuerndes Einkommen. Auch würde für die Zahlung der Lizenzge-bühren von einer ‚Mauritius-Gesellschaft’ an die andere keine Quellensteuer an-fallen.

 

Demnach wäre es möglich, die gesamten Steuerzahlungen in diesem Geschäfts-modell – bis auf die Kosten für die GBL2 Gesellschaft – auf fast 0% zu redu-zieren.

 

 

 

 

  1. Schlussbemerkung

 

Mauritius lockt mit seinem hervorragenden Finanzservicesektor und dem Nie-drigsteuersystem sowie auf Grund der zahlreichen DBA viele Gesellschaften aus aller Welt an.

 

In vielen Fällen des reinen Güterhandels, in denen lediglich einfache Gesell-schaftsstrukturen erforderlich sind, können ‚Mauritius-Gesellschaften’ genutzt werden. Allerdings können in Hong Kong oder anderen Offshore Ländern diese Geschäftstätigkeiten oft kostengünstiger abgewickelt werden.

 

Wenn jedoch andere Geschäftsmodelle geplant sind wie z.B.

 

         Gesellschaftsstrukturen für persönliche Dienstleistungsanbieter mit Tätigkeits-schwerpunkt in China, die aber dort keine Betriebsstätte betreiben oder

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

kompliziertere Gesellschaftsstrukturen, die sich über mehrere Rechtsordnun-gen erstrecken und die eine Vielzahl von Lizenzflüssen generieren bei denen

die verschiedenen mauritianischen DBA-Partnerstaaten einbezogen werden, dann sind die Offshore Gesellschaften der Republik Mauritius in der Tat eine sehr gute Wahl.

 

In Hinblick auf die zahlreichen mauritianischen DBA sind GBL1 Gesellschaften besonders geeignet für folgende Geschäftsmodelle:

 

Investments durch multinationale Gesellschaften;

 

große Infrastrukturprojekte;

 

die Erbringung von kurzfristigem Beratungsservice;

 

das Halten von Urheberrechten und Lizenzrechten.

 

 

Wir können Sie bei weiteren Fragen gerne beraten.

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitge-stellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser Newsletter eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. – Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitge-stellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materiel-ler oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grund-sätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Ver-schulden vorliegt.

 

Anhang 1: Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen der Republik Mauritius5

 

 

 

Land:

seit:

maximaler Quellensteuersatz bei:

 

 

 

 

Dividenden

Zinsen

Lizenzen

 

Barbados

2004

5%

5%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Belgien

1999

5% – 10%

10%

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Botswana

1996

5% – 10%

12%

12,5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

China

1995

5%

10%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

 

Kroatien

o.A.

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zypern

2000

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frankreich

1982

5% – 15%

Steuersatz wie nach Landesrecht

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deutschland

1990

5% – 15%

Steuersatz wie nach Landesrecht

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indien

1985

5% – 15%

ohne Angabe (o.A.)

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italien

1995

5% – 15%

Steuersatz wie nach Landesrecht

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kuwait

1998

befreit

5%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesotho

o.A.

10%

10%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luxemburg

1996

5% – 10%

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madagaskar

1995

5% – 10%

10%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia

1993

5% – 15%

10%

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mosambik

1999

8%, 10%, 15%

8%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Namibia

1996

5% – 10%

10%

5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nepal

1999

5%, 10%, 15%

10% – 15%

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oman

1998

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan

1995

10%

10%

12,5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruanda

o.A.

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seychellen

2005

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Senegal

o.A.

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Singapur

1996

befreit

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Süd Afrika

1997

5% – 15%

befreit

befreit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sri Lanka

1997

10% – 15%

10%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Swaziland

1994

7,5%

5%

7,5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schweden

1992

5% – 15%

10%

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thailand

1998

10%

10% – 15%

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uganda

2004

10%

10%

10%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UK

1987

10% – 15%

Steuersatz wie nach Landesrecht

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simbabwe

1992

10% – 20%

10%

15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anhang 2: Weitere Doppelbesteuerungsabkommen (DBA)

 

 

Die Republik Mauritius schloss mit folgenden Ländern DBA ab, die aber noch ratifiziert werden müssen:6

 

Bangladesch

 

Malawi

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 71 (GE)

Tax efficient Business in Mauritius

 

Nigeria

 

Russland

 

Tunesien

 

Vereinigte Arabischen Emirate

 

Vietnam

 

Sambia

 

 

 

 

Mauritius verhandelt mit folgenden Ländern über ein DBA:5

 

Kanada

 

Tschechische Republik

 

Griechenland

 

Portugal

 

Iranische Republik

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 73  (EN)

 

 

 

Establishment and Operation of Representa-

tive Offices in Vietnam

 

 

 

August 2011

 

 

 

A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t n e r s 2 0 1 1

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

Setting up a fully fledge company in Viet-nam can be complicated and time consum-ing. Representative Offices can be estab-lished faster and cheaper and as such offer a viable alternative to those who wish to enter the Vietnamese market but do not have the resources or client base to justify the time and expense of establishing a subsidiary.

  1. Legal Background

 

The key legislation which governs Represen-tative Offices (“Rep. Office”) in Vietnam can be found in the Commercial Law, De-cree No. 72/2006 and Circular No.11/2006.

 

Decree 72 sets out the conditions and proce-dures for the establishment and operation of a Rep. Offices in Vietnam

 

Under theses provisions a foreign business entity may set up a Rep. Office provided that certain criteria are met. It should be noted that some sectors (e.g. finance, tour-ism, legal services, education, etc) have their own specific Rep. Office regulations which must be consulted.

 

The Decree also details the rights and obli-gations of both the Rep. Office and the re-sponsible state bodies (Ministry of Trade and local Departments of Trade).

 

 

implementing the performance of contracts that the parent company has signed in Vietnam. Thus a Rep. Office is a dependant unit of the parent company and is not enti-tled to generate its own profits in Vietnam or to enter into contracts under its own name. The only exception to this rule is when the Head of the Rep. Office has been legally authorised by the foreign parent com-pany to enter into contracts on its behalf.

 

A Rep. Office does, however, have the right to rent office space, lease or purchase equip-ment and facilities necessary for its opera-tions and to recruit Vietnamese and foreign employees. In addition a Rep. Office will have its own company seal and may open an account at a Vietnamese bank for opera-tional purposes.

  1. Conditions

 

In general any business entity that is legally established and recognised by any foreign country and that has been operating for at least one year from the registration date will be entitled to set up a Rep. Office in Viet-nam. Usually the establishment of a Rep. Office will only be denied by the applicable authorities if the parent company falls into one of the following categories:

 

Trades goods and/or services which are prohibited by Vietnamese law;

 

III. Purpose

 

According to the Commercial Law and De-cree No. 72, a Rep. Office is an entity which is established solely for the purpose of en-hancing the commercial activities of its par-ent company. This includes monitoring and

 

The license of a previous Rep. Office was withdrawn within the last two years;

 

The establishment would harm national defence, social order and security or Vietnamese social values;

 

The establishment would harm the pub-lic’s health and environment; or The applicant submits an invalid applica-tion and fails to supplement or amend the same upon the request of the licens-ing body.

  1. Heads of Rep. Offices

 

Under Decree No. 72 the Head of a Rep. Office must NOT concurrently act as:

 

A head of a branch of a foreign entity in Vietnam;

 

A legal representative of the parent com-pany; or

 

A legal representative of a business en-tity which is established under Vietnam-ese law.

 

Further the head of a branch will be held li-able for any act which exceeds either their or the Rep. Office’s scope of authority.

  1. Licensing Procedure

 

The attraction of Rep. Offices in Vietnam lies in their flexibility and relatively simple li-censing procedure. These simplified proce-dures and the continuing restrictions on for-eign owned entities in some business sectors has led a considerable number of foreign companies to not only use Rep. Offices to seek and expedite opportunities but also to conduct extensive business activities. This is usually done by abusing their right to authorise the Head of Rep. Office to enter contracts on their behalf (please see above).

VII. Application File for Rep. Of-fices

 

A valid application file for the establishment of a Rep. Office must include the following documents:

 

(1) Standard application form;

 

A copy of the parent company’s busi-ness registration certificate or equivalent documents certified by the issuing au-thority. If these documents stipulate a set duration for the operation of the par-ent company then the residual term must be at least one year;

 

Audited financial statements or equiva-lent documents for the preceding fiscal year. These documents must certify the tax or financial status of the parent com-pany during the preceding fiscal year and be issued by the competent author-ity where the parent company is located. Alternatively any document which is cer-tified by a competent authority and con-firms the existence and operation of the parent company in the preceding fiscal year may be used; and

 

A copy of the parent company’s Charter.

 

All documents issued or certified by compe-tent foreign authorities for the purpose of a Rep. Office applications must be consular-ised and translated into Vietnamese. All copy documents must be notarized includ-ing all copy documents which are issued or certified by the competent Vietnamese au-thorities.

VIII. Issuance of the Rep. Office License and its Validity

 

  1. Issuance of the License

Once all the documents have been collected the application file must be submitted to the local provincial-level Department of Trade. The Department is required to complete its evaluation and issue the Rep. Office estab-lishment license within fifteen days from the date of receipt of a complete and valid ap-plication file. Copies of such licence will also be sent to the Ministry of Trade, the local provincial or city People’s Committee and the provincial level tax office, statistics office and police office.

 

If an application is invalid, the license issuing body must send a written notification to the parent company within three business days of the date such application was received.

 

The above time limits do not include any time which the parent company takes to amend or supplement its application.

 

If the establishment licence is not issued within the stipulated time limit then the li-cence issuing body must provide a written notification to the parent company to ex-plain the reasons for the delay.

 

However, in reality the above time limits are rarely met due to repeated amendment and supplementation requests which are usually made by the relevant competent officer.

 

  1. Validity

Rep. Office licenses are valid for five years and may be extended. However, such exten-sions can not exceed the validity period of the parent company’s business registration certificate.

  1. Post Licensing

 

  1. Notification of Operation of a Rep.

Office

 

Within forty five days from the date the Rep. Office license is issued an announcement must be published to notify the public of its establishment and operation. This an-nouncement must be placed in three con-secutive editions of local or central newspa-pers or electronic media which are author-ized for publication in Vietnam. Also within forty five days the Rep. Office must offi-cially commence its operations and must provide written notice of such to the local Department of Trade.

 

 

  1. Opening Bank Accounts

Rep. Offices may open bank accounts at banks licensed to operate in Vietnam for the payment of foreign currency disbursements and of Vietnamese Dong disbursements which are sourced from a foreign currency. However, due to the limitations on its scope of activities a Rep. Office must not generate a profit. Further these accounts must only be used for the Rep. Office’s operations and must never be used to remit money abroad. Finally, the opening, use and closure of the Rep. Office’s accounts must be consistent with the regulations of the State Bank of Vi-etnam.

 

  1. Operational Reporting Regime

The Rep. Office must submit an annual op-eration report to the licensing authority. This submission must occur before the last busi-ness day of the following January. However the said authority may also require the Rep. Office to report, provide data on and/or ex-plain any aspect of their operations at any-time during the year. Furthermore, Rep. Of-fices may be subject to random checks and inspections, by both the licensing authority and any other competent authority. The rea-son for such inspection is usually not pro-vided.

 

Decree No. 72 tries to limit the potential for abuse of this inspection system by providing that anyone who takes advantage of an in-spection/check for “his/her own interest” or to cause “harassment” or “difficulties” for the Rep. Office shall be subject to ad-ministrative penalties or even criminal prose-cution. Further if such acts causes “loss” or “damage” to the Rep. Office then the of-fender may be required to pay compen-sation.

 

 

  1. Re-issuance, Amendment, Ad-dition and Extension of Rep. Of-fice Licenses

Prior to the issuance of the Rep. Office li-cense the foreign parent company is free to amend or supplement their application.

 

Following the issuance, if any of the infor-mation therein changes e.g. the office ad-dress then the license must be re-issued. Similarly the Rep. Office must apply for a re-issuance if the licence is lost, destroyed or torn. Further if the parent entity changes its operations or place of registration from one country to another, then the Rep. Office must submit an application for the re-issu-ance of its own licence. This concept origi-nates from the Rep. Office’s status as a de-pendant unit of the parent entity.

 

As aforementioned, a Rep. Office should not generate a profit; as such they are not subject to corporate income tax. Over the years many companies have therefore estab-lished Rep. Offices for the express purpose of making tax-free profits. In an attempted to counteract this malpractice, Decree 72 explicitly reduces the operational scope of a Rep. Office to the bare minimum. Further-more, as noted above Decree 72 also allows the authorities to carry out inspections in or-der to ensure that a Rep. Office is adhering to these limitations. In accordance with the practice currently observed in Ho Chi Minh City, it is advisable to anticipate frequent vis-its from the local tax officials.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 76          (DE)

 

 

 

 

 

Das Hongkonger Sozialversicherungssystem

 

 

 

Juli 2013

 

 

 

 

A l l  r i g h t s r e s e r v e d ©  L o r e n z  & P a r t n e r s  2 0 1 3

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitgestellten In-formationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass diese eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche ge-gen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nut-zung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvoll-ständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

  1. Einleitung

Im Unterschied zu europäischen Standards ist das Hongkonger Sozialversicherungsrecht wesentlich arbeitgeberfreundlicher gestaltet und bietet Arbeitnehmern weit weniger Ab-sicherung als in Deutschland. Dennoch ist es unerlässlich über die bestehenden Pflichten Bescheid zu wissen, wenn man als Arbeitge-ber in Hongkong tätig ist.

 

  1. Sozialversicherung in Hong-

kong

 

Das System der Hongkonger Sozialversiche-rung ist nicht mit den Systemen Deutsch-lands, Österreichs oder der Schweiz zu ver-gleichen.

Dies wird unter anderem an der Ausgestal-tung des Hongkonger Arbeitsrechtes deut-lich, welches vornehmlich die Interessen des Arbeitgebers berücksichtigt. Danach muss der Arbeitgeber seine Mitarbeiter lediglich in zwei Bereichen absichern. So muss zum einen eine Art „Rentenpensionsfond“

 

(Mandatory Provident Fund (MPF)) und zum anderen eine Unfallversicherung 1 für ar-beitsbezogene Unfälle abgeschlossen wer-den.

 

Darüber hinausgehende Versicherungs-pflichten bestehen in Hongkong generell nicht2. Daher ist die Gewährung (oder die Unterstützung für eine allgemeine Kranken-versicherung) einer Krankenhausversiche-rung oder einer private Unfallversicherung jeweils von der Entscheidung des Arbeitge-bers abhängig. Diese Entscheidung richtet

 

Geregelt in der Employees Compensation Ordinance, Chapter 282.

 

Ausnahmen können besondere Beschäftigungsverhält-nisse ergeben.


 

 

sich sowohl nach der internen Firmenpoli-tik, als auch nach den langfristigen Bestre-bungen des Arbeitgebers, seine Belegschaft zu (er)halten.

 

Mandatory Provident Fund (MPF)

Obwohl in Hongkong bereits seit langem bekannt ist, dass die Bevölkerung rapide al-tert, wurde erst 1995 das Gesetz für den Mandatory Provident Fund (MPF Ordinance) erlassen3.

 

Derzeit beträgt der Bevölkerungsanteil der über 65-jährigen 13%. Laut Schätzungen der Regierung von Hongkong wird dieser Anteil bis 2018 auf 16% und bis 2033 auf 27% an-steigen. Mit Erlass der MPF Ordinance wurde in Hongkong erstmals ein formelles System für die Rentenabsicherung geregelt.

 

Bis zur Einführung des MPF Systems im Dezember 2000 waren lediglich etwa 30% aller 3,4 Millionen Hongkonger Arbeitskräf-te in einem Rentensystem integriert. Heute sind ca. 85% der arbeitenden Bevölkerung in irgendeiner Form in eine Rentenabsiche-rung eingebunden.

 

Gemäß Section 7 der MPF Ordinance muss der Arbeitgeber dafür Sorge tragen, dass der Arbeitnehmer bei einem der vielfältig ange-botenen Rentenfonds Mitglied wird. Versi-cherungspflichtig sind grundsätzlich alle Ar-beitnehmer zwischen 18 und 65 Jahren, die einen unbefristeten Arbeitsvertrag haben.

 

Ausgenommene Personen sind unter ande-rem Ausländer, die weniger als 13 Monate in

3 Mandatory Provident Fund Schemes Ordinance, Chap-ter 485.

 

 

Hongkong arbeiten, wenn sie in ihrem Heimatland Mitglied in einem Rentensystem oder Angestellte der Europäischen Union sind.

 

Die monatlichen Mindestbeiträge betragen sowohl für den Arbeitgeber, als auch für den Arbeitnehmer 5% des Bruttoeinkom-mens des Arbeitnehmers. Der Maximalbe-trag liegt für beide Parteien bei 1.250 HKD (ca. 125 Euro) pro Monat. Sofern der Ar-beitnehmer weniger als 6.500 HKD (ca. 650 Euro) verdient, ist dieser von der Beitrags-zahlung ausgenommen, der Arbeitgeber muss aber dennoch Beiträge zahlen. Die Obergrenze für die Beitragsbemessung liegt bei 25.000 HKD (ca. 2.500 Euro), sodass bei einem monatlichen Einkommen von über 25.000 HKD vom Arbeitnehmer und vom Arbeitgeber je maximal 1.250 HKD (ca. 125 Euro) pro Monat in den MPF Fond einzuzahlen sind. Der gesamte Beitrag ist vom Arbeitgeber abzuführen.

 

In der folgenden Übersicht werden die Un-terteilung der Pflichtbeitragsgrenzen und die jeweilige Höhe der Pflichtbeiträge für Ar-beitgeber und Arbeitnehmer dargestellt:

 

Monatliches

Pflichtbeiträge (HKD)

Arbeitnehmer-

Arbeitgeber

Arbeitnehmer

einkommen

 

 

HKD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

weniger als

5% des

null

6.500 HKD

Einkommens

 

(ca.650 Euro)

 

 

zwischen

5% des

5% des Ein-

6.500 HKD

Einkommens

kommens

und

 

 

25.000 HKD

 

 

(2.500 Euro)

 

 

Ab

1.250 HKD

1.250 HKD

25.000 HKD

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neben dem monatlichen Pflichtbeitrag von 5% des Arbeitnehmereinkommens kann der Arbeitgeber darüber hinaus freiwillig höhere Beiträge für seine Angestellten leisten. Auch Arbeitnehmern ist es freigestellt, ob sie freiwillige Zusatzleistungen erbringen wol-

 

len um eine höhere Ausschüttung beim Renteneintritt zu erhalten. Für den Arbeit-geber sind die zusätzlichen Zahlungen als Betriebsausgaben abzugsfähig, der Arbeit-nehmer kann zusätzliche Zahlungen aller-dings nicht steuerlich geltend machen.

Für den Arbeitgeber bedeutet die Gewäh-rung freiwilliger Mehrleistungen, dass er die-se Zahlungen im Falle einer Vertragbeendigung mit dem Anspruch des Arbeitnehmers auf Gratifikationen für lang-jährige Betriebstreue (long service payment) oder Abfindungszahlung (severance payment) verrechnen kann, welches zu einer erhebli-chen Minderung der Abfindung führen kann. Allerdings ist zurzeit in Diskussion, ob dies aufrechterhalten werden soll.

 

Steuerlich sind die MPF Beitragszahlungen für den Arbeitgeber bis zu einer Beitrags-höhe von 15% des jährlichen Arbeitneh-mergesamteinkommens als Betriebsausga-ben abzugsfähig.

 

Auch Arbeitnehmer können ihre Beitrags-leistungen ab dem Veranlagungsjahr 2012-13 bis zu einer maximalen Höhe von 14.500 HKD (ca. 1.450 Euro) und ab dem Veran-lagungsjahr 2013 -14 sogar bis zu 15.000 HKD (ca. 1.500 Euro) steuerlich geltend machen, darüber hinaus gezahlte freiwillige Beiträge des Arbeitsnehmers können steuer-lich nicht geltend gemacht werden.

 

  1. Arbeitnehmerversicherung

(Employees Compensation)

 

Neben dem MPF System besteht als weitere Pflichtversicherung die Employees Compensation Insurance (ECI). Diese ist in der Employees Compensation Ordinance, Chapter 282 geregelt.

 

Danach ist jeder Arbeitgeber verpflichtet, seine Arbeitnehmer gegen Schäden und Verletzungen, die aus einem arbeitsbezoge-nen Unfall oder aus einem Unfall während der Arbeitszeit resultieren, zu versichern. Diese ist mit der deutschen Unfallversiche-rung vergleichbar.

 

Für die Zahlung von Entschädigungsleis-tungen werden Unfälle erfasst, die sowohl Verletzungen, als auch den Tod des Arbeit-nehmers nach sich gezogen haben. Auch die medizinischen und gerichtlichen Kosten werden entsprechend den Regelungen ge-tragen.

 

Oftmals wird die ECI von einer Büroversi-cherung mit umfasst. Die Kosten beginnen ab ca. 500 HKD (ca. 50 Euro) pro Jahr, nach der Art der ausgeübten Tätigkeit und der Höhe der Officeversicherung pro Ar-beitnehmer.

 

  1. Weitere Versicherungen und etwaige Kosten

Neben dem MPF und der ECI bestehen für den Arbeitgeber keine weiteren Versiche-

 

rungspflichten gegenüber seinen Arbeit-nehmern. Jedwede weitere Leistung ist frei-willig und entsprechend der Firmenpolitik auszugestalten. Es kann in Hongkong nicht von einer „Regelversorgung für Arbeitneh-mer“ für derartige Versicherungsleistungen gesprochen werden.

 

Als zusätzliche Versicherungen könnten zum Beispiel eine private Unfallversiche-rung, eine Krankenversicherung, eine Reise-versicherung oder ggf. auch eine Versiche-rung für Krankenhausaufenthalte in Be-tracht kommen.

 

Die Kosten für diese Versicherungen sind sehr unterschiedlich und orientieren sich wie in Deutschland/Schweiz am Alter sowie am Geschlecht des Versicherungsnehmers.

 

 

Newsletter No. 77         (EN)

 

 

 

 

A brief introduction to the legal environment for

 

investments in Vietnam

December 2012

 

 

All rights reserved  Lorenz & Partners 2012

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  1. Introduction


 

Investment in Vietnam has become even more attractive since Vietnam was granted accession to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) on 11 th of January 2007, after a wait-ing period of 12 years. To comply with the requirements, the Vietnamese National As-sembly passed a new Law on Investment (LOI), which became effective on 1st July 2006. The new LOI is an approach to treat domestic and foreign investors equally in most of the fields of investment.

 

The following paragraphs will highlight some of the main issues concerning invest-ment activities in Vietnam. You will find a short description of the currently available investment vehicles, tax rates for Personal Income and Corporate Income Tax as well as the current minimum salary rates, labour regulations and land use issues.

 

Foreign Direct Investment and Available Entity Forms

 

  1. Forms of Direct Investment

Establishment of economic organisa-tions, being 100% domestic or foreign owned;

 

Joint ventures between domestic and foreign investors;

 

Investment in the following contractual forms:

 

Business Co-operation Contract (BCC): A contract signed between investors to co-operate in business and to share prof

 

 

its or products without creating a legal entity.

 

Build-Operate-Transfer Contract (BOT):

 

A contract between a competent State body and an investor. The investor shall construct and operate an infrastructure facility for a fixed period of time. After expiration of this period, the facility has to be transferred to the State of Viet-nam.

 

Build-Transfer-Operate Contract (BTO): In contrary to the BOT, the facility is transferred to the State of Vietnam after completion. The investor is granted the right to operate the facility for a fixed period of time to recover the invested capital and to gain profit.

 

Build-Transfer Contract (BT):

In contrary to BOT and BTO, the inves-tor does not get the right to operate the facility. The Government, however, shall create conditions for the investor to im-plement another project, so that he can recover the invested capital and gain profit.

 

Investment in business development;

 

Purchase of shares or contribution of capital in order to participate in the management of investment activities;

 

Investment in carrying out mergers and acquisition of an enterprise;

 

Other forms of direct investment.

 

 

Available Entity Forms

(1)        Branch

A branch is a dependent subsidiary of a for-eign entity which is permitted to perform all or a number of the functions of the enter-prise in accordance with the Commercial Law and the international treaties of which Vietnam is a member.

 

A foreign company already existing 5 years which is specialized in the purchase and sale of goods or directly related services may open a branch in Vietnam.

 

The Ministry of Industry and Trade is re-sponsible for the issuance of a branch li-cence. Within 15 days of the receipt of a complete and sound application dossier the license should be issued.

 

(2) Representative Office (Rep. Office)

A Rep. Office is a dependent unit of the en-terprise, having the task of acting as the rep-resentative in the interest of the enterprise and protecting such interests. The organisa-tion and operations of a rep. office have to be in accordance with the law.

 

Rep. Offices shall only be used to evaluate the Vietnamese market and to prepare a market entry for activities of the foreign parent company. Direct business activity is not allowed. The head of the Rep. Office is, in this function, only entitled to sign con-tracts with regard to the employment of

 

Rep. Office’s staff and its premises.

 

However, the head of the Rep. Office can be authorized to sign contracts on behalf of the foreign entity. But it should be taken into account that such authorizations can also lead to a possible tax exposure of the Rep. Office with regard to corporate income tax.

 

 

The Provincial Industry and Trade Services are responsible for the issuance of the li-cense of a Rep. Office.

 

Within 15 days of the receipt of a complete and sound application dossier the license should be issued.

 

(3) Limited Liability Company

A limited liability company (LLC) is an en-terprise, in which its members are liable for the debts and other property obligations of the enterprise only within the charter capital. The law does not require a minimum charter capital. But the Investment Certificate will stipulate a Charter Capital which has to be in a reasonable relationship to the scope of the business. The number of its members is lim-ited to a maximum of fifty.

 

A limited liability company is a legal entity. It obtains this status from the day of issu-ance of the Investment Certificate.

 

A limited liability company cannot issue shares. However, when a member has fully paid his share of capital contribution, he will receive a capital contribution certificate.

 

The day -to-day business is managed by the director. He may also in addition to act as the legal representative of the LLC.

 

In case of a Multi Member Limited Com-pany MMLC the director or the chairman of the members council has to be the legal representative of the company.

 

A Single Member Limited Company SMLC is owned by one person or legal entity.

 

(4) Partnerships

A partnership is an enterprise, in which two or more persons have united under one common name for a common purpose with the intent of sharing the profit thereof. In addition to unlimited liability partners there may be limited liability partners (capital con-tributing partners).

 

In a partnership, the partners are liable for the obligations of the company to the extent of all their assets. Limited partners are liable for the debts of the company only to the ex-tent of the amount of capital they have con-tributed to the company.

 

A partnership under Vietnamese law is a le-gal entity. It will enjoy this status from the date of issuance of the Investment Certifi-cate.

 

(5) Shareholding Company

The procedure for setting up a shareholding company is similar to the set up of a limited liability company. The major difference is that a shareholding company is permitted to offer shares to the public.

 

(6) Business Co-operation Contract (BCC)

 

Due to the fact that this investment vehicle only consists of a contract, the participating foreign and Vietnamese parties remain inde-pendent tax and liability subjects.

 

In order to limit the liability of the parties, the founding of a separate entity seems ad-visable. The legal base for this investment form is not detailed and therefore a signifi-cant number of major issues are rather un-clear. Consequentially drafting the co-operation contract should be done with ade-quate care.

 

Mandatory contents of a BCC contract are: purpose, duration and scope of the co-operation; rights and obligations of the par-ticipating parties as well as procedures for the distribution of losses and profits.

 

One, at least theoretical, benefit of this in-vestment form is the flexibility of the struc-ture. The dissolution requires no more than a profit and loss distribution. From a practi-cal point of view the dissolution is rather

 

 

complicated, due to the independent book keeping of the BCC parties.

 

However foreign direct investments in cer-tain sectors, i.e. telecommunication, have to be made in form of a BCC.

 

  1. Forms of Indirect Investment

Purchase of shareholding, shares, bonds and other valuable papers;

 

Indirect investment through securities investment funds;

 

Indirect investment through other in-termediary financial institutions.

 

  1. Taxes

Vietnam has entered into a considerable number of double taxation treaties (please consult Appendix I). However the implica-tion of such treaties seems to be even more challenging in Vietnam than in other coun-tries. Local tax authorities have a tendency to use a rather creative approach to the re-spective treaties and regulations. Therefore the co -operation with a locally well con-nected specialist is highly advisable.

 

  1. a) Corporate Income Tax

The standard rate for corporate income tax is 25%. Depending on the scope of business, the business sector and the locality of the business establishment a considerable num-ber of tax incentives can be applied for.

 

Preferential rates of 10%, 15% and 20% might apply for projects, if they are qualified for one or more of the following criteria:

 

Investment in sectors where invest-ment is encouraged, e.g. projects with a high export ratio or projects concerning infrastructure or affore-station;

 

Investment in geographical areas, en-titled to investment preferences;

  

Investments in industrial parks or export processing zones.

 

In general, such preferential rates are only applied for a certain period of time reaching from 10 over 12 to 15 years.

 

In addition, tax holidays up to 4 years or a reduction of corporate income tax up to a period of 9 years may be granted to projects which meet at least some of the following conditions:

 

Investment in encouraged sectors or areas;

 

Projects having a certain number of employees;

 

 

 

Investment in industrial zones or export processing zones;

 

Newly established projects.

 

 

Personal Income Tax

Foreigners in Vietnam are in principle sub-ject to personal income tax. Foreigners stay-ing for up to 183 days have to pay personal income tax on their income sourced in Viet-nam. The applicable personal income tax rate is a flat tax rate of 20 %. Foreigners staying for more than 183 days are progres-sively taxed on their worldwide income on the basis of the following tax brackets:

 

 

 

Tax

Taxed income per year

Taxed income per month

Tax rate (%)

grade

(VND million)

(VND million)

 

 

 

 

 

1

Up to 60

Up to 5

5

 

(about 2,250 EUR)

(about 200 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

2

Between over 60 and 120

Between over 5 and 10

10

 

(about 2,250 EUR – 4,500 EUR)

(about 200 EUR – 400 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

3

Between over 120 and 216

Between over 10 and 18

15

 

(about 4,500 EUR – 8,100 EUR)

(about 400 EUR – 700 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

4

Between over 216 and 384

Between over 18 and 32

20

 

(about 8,100 EUR – 14,350 EUR)

(about 7000 EUR – 1,250 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

5

Between over 384 and 624

Between over 32 and 52

25

 

(about 14,350 EUR – 23,300 EUR)

(about 1,250 EUR – 2,000 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

6

Between over 624 and 960

Between over 52 and 80

30

 

(about 23,300 EUR – 35,800 EUR)

(about 2,000 EUR – 3,050 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

7

Over 960

Over 80

35

 

(over around 35,800 EUR)

(over around 3,050 EUR)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Labour Regulations
  2. a) Minimum Wages

From 1 January 2013, the monthly minimum wages for workers have been raised to the following levels:

 

In Hanoi and HCMC 117,5 USD;

 

         In the suburbs of Hanoi and HCMC as well as in Haiphong, Ha-long City, Bien Hoa, Vung Tau and other cities 105 USD

 

In other areas from 82,5 USD to 90 USD.

 

The above stated salaries have to be paid to

 

„simple“ workers. Workers who received a vocational training have to be paid an at least 7 % higher salary.

 

In comparison: minimum wages in: Thailand: 291 USD (300 Baht / 9,72 USD per day);

 

Cambodia: 55 USD;

 

Shanghai: 230 USD; Beijing: 200 USD.

 

  1. b) Social Security and Health Insurance

Employers have to contribute to the Viet-namese social security system for all Viet-namese employees every month at a rate of 17% of the total wages of the employee. The employee also has to contribute to the sys-tem, however, only at a rate of 7%.

 

Furthermore, employers are obliged to pay for their Vietnamese employees health in-surance premiums at a rate of 3% while 1.5 % have to be paid by the employee.

 

The contributions of the employer are ex-empt from personal income tax, since the

 

 

 

 

 

Vietnamese tax law does not consider these contributions as taxable benefit to the em-ployee. All expenses of the employee are deductible when computing personal income tax.

 

  1. Land and Land use rights

“The ownership of land belongs to the en-tire people.” Therefore the land itself cannot be bought and is leased out or allocated by the government. Such land use rights are only available for institutional foreign inves-tors and only valid for a restricted time pe-riod, in general 50 years. In exceptional cases the Prime Minister can extend the duration to a maximum of 70 years.

 

The current regime on land use rights, espe-cially for residential housing is widely criti-cized by resident foreign investors as well as investors with Vietnamese origin (so called VietKieu, former emigrants or their off-spring). However, only the latter may specu-late upon a change in the policy on land and land use rights in the near future.

 

Usually a memorandum of understanding between the foreign investor and the land-lord will be signed prior to the investment certificate application. Upon approval of the investment certificate, the respective land use rights will either be transferred to the foreign investor or a contractual connection with the landlord will be established.

 

The use of land use rights as loan security by foreign investors is almost impossible. Ex-ceptional cases are certain industrial estates, i.e. Quang Trung Software City, where for-eign investors are entitled to use land use rights as collateral.

 

 

Appendix I:    Some Double Taxation Treaties and Summary on withholding tax rates

 

Name of contracting

Effective date

Withholding Tax

Withholding Tax on

State

in Vietnam

on Interest in %

Royalties in %

Australia

01/01/1993

10

10

Austria

01/01/2010

10

7.5 or 10

Belarus

01/01/1998

10

15

Belgium

01/01/2000

10

5, 10 or 15

Bulgaria

01/01/1997

10

15

Canada

01/01/1999

10

7.5 or 10

China

01/01/1997

10

10

Cuba

01/01/2004

10

10

Czech Republic

01/01/1999

10

10

Denmark

01/01/1997

10

5 or 15

Finland

01/01/2003

10

10

France

01/01/1994

Nil

10

Germany

01/01/1997

5 or 10

7.5 or 10

Hong Kong

12/08/2009

10

7

Hungary

01/01/1996

10

10

Iceland

27/12/2002

10

10

India

01/01/1996

10

10

Indonesia

01/01/2000

15

15

Ireland

01/01/2009

10

5 / 10 / 15

Israel

03/10/2011

10

5 / 7.5 / 15

Italy

01/01/1996

10

7.5 or 10

Japan

01/01/1996

10

10

Korea (Rep.)

01/01/1995

10

5 or 15

Laos

30/09/1996

10

10

Luxembourg

01/01/1996

10

10

Malaysia

01/01/1997

10

10

Mongolia

11/10/1996

10

10

Myanmar

01/04/2004

10

10

The Netherlands

01/01/1996

7 or 10

5, 10 or 15

Norway

01/01/1997

10

10

Philippines

01/01/2004

15

15

Poland

01/01/1996

10

10 or 15

Romania

01/01/1997

10

15

Russia

01/01/1997

10

15

Singapore

01/01/1993

10

5 or 15

Spain

01/01/2006

10

10

Sweden

01/01/1995

10

5 or 15

Switzerland

01/01/1998

10

10

Taiwan

01/06/1998

10

15

Thailand

01/01/1993

10 or 15

15

Ukraine

01/01/1997

10

10

United Kingdom

01/01/1995

10

10

Uzbekistan

01/01/1997

10

15

 

 

The applicable withholding tax rate under domestic Vietnamese Tax law is 10% both for royalties and interest.

 

Whenever the rate under domestic tax law is lower than the maximum rate under the respective DTA, the domestic tax rates constitutes the maximum rate. This is the case for the following countries:

 

Belarus

Poland

Belgium

Romania

Bulgaria

Russia

Denmark

Singapore

Indonesia

Sweden

Republic of Korea

Taiwan

Netherlands

Thailand

Philippines

Uzbekistan