Newsletter N7

Newsletter No. 55 (EN)

 

 

 

 

Trade Terms in International Sale of Goods

 

and International Commercial Terms

(INCOTERMS)

 

 

 

March 2014

 

  

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. What are Trade Terms?

 

Every sale of goods contract should in-clude terms which govern key trade issues such as the time, place and manner of transfer for such goods. These terms are called “trade terms”. In other words trade terms set out the responsibilities of the buyer and seller in regards to the delivery of the goods in question e.g. method of delivery, payment of shipping costs, insur-ance and customs.

  1. The Use of Trade Terms

 

As noted above trade terms are used to govern various issues in regards to sales of goods transactions. Over the years stan-dardised predefined trade terms have been developed in order to reduce the nego-tiation time for such transactions. The most popular of these predefined terms are the ‘International Commercial Terms’ (INCOTERMS).

III. What are the International Com-mercial Terms (INCOTERMS)?

 

INCOTERMS were first introduced by the International Chamber of Commerce in 1936. The INCOTERMS consist of a list of standard trade terms (usually re-ferred to by their abbreviated title) and a set of international recognised rules on how such terms should be interpreted in practice. The purpose of the INCO-TERMS is to standardise the usage of trade terms in order to reduce uncertainty

 

 

and avoid disputes. The most recent ver-sion of the INCOTERMS was published in 2010. However older version can still be used if the parties so wish.

  1. Validity

 

INCOTERMS will only apply if their ap-plication is expressly stated in the sale of goods contract itself or in the relevant of-fer/quotation, general purchase and sale conditions, order, order confirmations etc. Moreover it is crucial that the aforemen-tioned reference specifically states which version of the INCOTERMS is applicable e.g. “INCOTERMS 2010.” Due to the dif-ferences between the different versions a reference to just “INCOTERMS” can cause numerous problems.

 

Template delivery clause: “delivery shall be CIF BANGKOK INCOTERMS 2010.

 

  1. What do the INCOTERMS cover?

 

The INCOTERMS define the rights and obligations of the parties with regard to:

 

  • Delivery and transportation docu-mentation (or equivalent electronic notifications);

 

  • Allocation of costs for freight, taxes, duties, insurance, etc.; and

 

  • Transfer of risk.

 

INCOTERMS do not govern:

 

  • The transfer of ownership and other rights arising from owner-ship;

 

  • Breaches of contract and the con-sequences thereof;

 

  • Description or quality of goods;

 

  • The timing and method of pay-ment;

 

  • Choice of law; or

 

  • Issues related to forwarders /car-riers.

VII. Categories of INCOTERMS

 

The INCOTERMS definitions are broadly divided into four groups as follows:

 

  • The E-terms (EXW) under which the seller’s only responsibility is to make the goods available to the buyer at the seller’s premises;

 

  • The F-terms (FCA, FAS and FOB) under which the seller must deliver the goods to a carrier who is ap-pointed by the buyer;

 

  • The C-terms (CFR, CIF, CPT and CIP) under which the seller must ar-range the transportation of the goods but does not assume the risk of loss or damage to the goods or of any additional costs which arise due to events which occur after ship-ment/dispatch; and

 

  • The D-terms (DAT, DAP, and DDP) under which the seller bears all the costs and risks of delivering the goods to their final destination.

VIII.  Most   Frequently    Used   INCO-

 

TERMS

 

Please note that the terms FOB and CFR which are discussed below mainly apply to

 

 

 

contracts which use maritime and inland waterway transport, however, they can also be agreed upon in case of air freight.

  1. Ex Works (“EXW”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The seller must pack the goods using ap-propriate packaging and then make the goods available at their premises for the buyer’s collection at the agreed time. If no specific location within the seller’s prem-ises has been agreed, then the seller may select the location which is most conven-ient for him. The risk of loss or damage to the goods passes to the buyer as soon as the seller fulfils the delivery obligation i.e. when the goods are placed at the buyer’s disposal.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller has no obligation in relation to transportation or insurance. The buyer is responsible for these matters.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The buyer must obtain any requisite ex-port and import documentation and com-plete all export and import custom for-malities at their own expense.

 

EXW places the least obligations on the seller, as the buyer has to bear all costs and risks involved in removing the goods from the seller’s premises.

 

 

 

  1. Free On Board (“FOB”)

(1) Delivery

 

Under this term the seller’s delivery obli-gation extends to ensuring that the goods (properly packaged) are safely placed on board the buyer’s appointed vessel in a manner which is customary for the port of shipment. As soon as the goods have passed over the ship’s rail the seller’s obli-gation is fulfilled. Up until that point the seller bears all the risks for the goods.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The vessel must be provided and con-tracted by the buyer at their own expense. Equally the buyer must arrange and bear the cost of any insurance coverage.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The seller must obtain any requisite ex-port documentation and complete all ex-port custom formalities at their own ex-pense. Equally the buyer must obtain any requisite import documentation and com-plete all import custom formalities at their own expense.

  1. Cost and Freight (“CFR”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and the passing of the risk is the same as for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller must arrange and bear the cost of transporting the goods to the named port of destination. However, the seller is

 

 

 

not obliged to take out an insurance policy for the goods.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is identical as that for FOB.

 

Please note that many traders continue to use the traditional abbreviation ‘C&F’ when they refer to the above obligations. However any contract which says “C&F INCOTERMS” will be assumed to refer to the definition of C&F found in INCO-TERMS 1980. This definition is substan-tially different from the INCOTERMS 2010 definition of CRF. Thus it is strongly recommended that the parties use the cor-rect abbreviation i.e. CFR in order to avoid any unexpected confusion or dis-pute.

 

  1. Cost, Insurance      and     Freight

 

(“CIF”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and passing of risk for CIF is the same as that for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller is obligated to procure and bear the cost of transport and ‘minimum insur-ance cover of the Institute Cargo Clause’ for the goods in question to the named port of destination. If the buyer requires additional insurance they must bear the re-lating cost themselves.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is the same as that for CFR.

 

 

  1. Conclusion

 

When negotiating an international sales contract, both parties need to pay atten-tion to the trade terms. Each party must be aware of the extent of their responsi-bilities as agreeing to certain trade terms may result in additional costs. The IN-COTERMS can be very helpful in that they define each party’s exact responsibili-ties and risks and thus help to speed up the process of trade negotiations. How-ever, INCOTERMS should be applied carefully, specifically the parties should ensure that the exact version of INCO-TERMS used reflects their real intentions.

 

 

 

Responsibility

Warehouse

 

Storage

Export Packing

Loading

Charges

Inland Freight

Terminal

 

Charges

Forwarder’s

 

Fees

Loading Onto

Vessel

Ocean/Air

Freight

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Export

Charges On Ar-rival at Destina-tion

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Import


 

 

 

 

Ex Works/

Free On

Cost and

Cost, Insurance

EXW

Board/FOB

Freight/CFR

& Freight/CIF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 55 (EN)

 

 

 

Trade Terms in International Sale of Goods

 

and International Commercial Terms

(INCOTERMS)

 

 

 

March 2014

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. What are Trade Terms?

 

Every sale of goods contract should in-clude terms which govern key trade issues such as the time, place and manner of transfer for such goods. These terms are called “trade terms”. In other words trade terms set out the responsibilities of the buyer and seller in regards to the delivery of the goods in question e.g. method of delivery, payment of shipping costs, insur-ance and customs.

  1. The Use of Trade Terms

 

As noted above trade terms are used to govern various issues in regards to sales of goods transactions. Over the years stan-dardised predefined trade terms have been developed in order to reduce the nego-tiation time for such transactions. The most popular of these predefined terms are the ‘International Commercial Terms’ (INCOTERMS).

III. What are the International Com-mercial Terms (INCOTERMS)?

 

INCOTERMS were first introduced by the International Chamber of Commerce in 1936. The INCOTERMS consist of a list of standard trade terms (usually re-ferred to by their abbreviated title) and a set of international recognised rules on how such terms should be interpreted in practice. The purpose of the INCO-TERMS is to standardise the usage of trade terms in order to reduce uncertainty

 

 

and avoid disputes. The most recent ver-sion of the INCOTERMS was published in 2010. However older version can still be used if the parties so wish.

  1. Validity

 

INCOTERMS will only apply if their ap-plication is expressly stated in the sale of goods contract itself or in the relevant of-fer/quotation, general purchase and sale conditions, order, order confirmations etc. Moreover it is crucial that the aforemen-tioned reference specifically states which version of the INCOTERMS is applicable e.g. “INCOTERMS 2010.” Due to the dif-ferences between the different versions a reference to just “INCOTERMS” can cause numerous problems.

 

Template delivery clause: “delivery shall be CIF BANGKOK INCOTERMS 2010.

 

  1. What do the INCOTERMS cover?

 

The INCOTERMS define the rights and obligations of the parties with regard to:

 

  • Delivery and transportation docu-mentation (or equivalent electronic notifications);

 

  • Allocation of costs for freight, taxes, duties, insurance, etc.; and

 

  • Transfer of risk.

 

INCOTERMS do not govern:

 

  • The transfer of ownership and other rights arising from owner-ship;

 

  • Breaches of contract and the con-sequences thereof;

 

  • Description or quality of goods;

 

  • The timing and method of pay-ment;

 

  • Choice of law; or

 

  • Issues related to forwarders /car-riers.

VII. Categories of INCOTERMS

 

The INCOTERMS definitions are broadly divided into four groups as follows:

 

  • The E-terms (EXW) under which the seller’s only responsibility is to make the goods available to the buyer at the seller’s premises;

 

  • The F-terms (FCA, FAS and FOB) under which the seller must deliver the goods to a carrier who is ap-pointed by the buyer;

 

  • The C-terms (CFR, CIF, CPT and CIP) under which the seller must ar-range the transportation of the goods but does not assume the risk of loss or damage to the goods or of any additional costs which arise due to events which occur after ship-ment/dispatch; and

 

  • The D-terms (DAT, DAP, and DDP) under which the seller bears all the costs and risks of delivering the goods to their final destination.

VIII.  Most   Frequently    Used   INCO-

 

TERMS

 

Please note that the terms FOB and CFR which are discussed below mainly apply to

 

 

 

contracts which use maritime and inland waterway transport, however, they can also be agreed upon in case of air freight.

  1. Ex Works (“EXW”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The seller must pack the goods using ap-propriate packaging and then make the goods available at their premises for the buyer’s collection at the agreed time. If no specific location within the seller’s prem-ises has been agreed, then the seller may select the location which is most conven-ient for him. The risk of loss or damage to the goods passes to the buyer as soon as the seller fulfils the delivery obligation i.e. when the goods are placed at the buyer’s disposal.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller has no obligation in relation to transportation or insurance. The buyer is responsible for these matters.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The buyer must obtain any requisite ex-port and import documentation and com-plete all export and import custom for-malities at their own expense.

 

EXW places the least obligations on the seller, as the buyer has to bear all costs and risks involved in removing the goods from the seller’s premises.

 

  1. Free On Board (“FOB”)

(1) Delivery

 

Under this term the seller’s delivery obli-gation extends to ensuring that the goods (properly packaged) are safely placed on board the buyer’s appointed vessel in a manner which is customary for the port of shipment. As soon as the goods have passed over the ship’s rail the seller’s obli-gation is fulfilled. Up until that point the seller bears all the risks for the goods.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The vessel must be provided and con-tracted by the buyer at their own expense. Equally the buyer must arrange and bear the cost of any insurance coverage.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The seller must obtain any requisite ex-port documentation and complete all ex-port custom formalities at their own ex-pense. Equally the buyer must obtain any requisite import documentation and com-plete all import custom formalities at their own expense.

  1. Cost and Freight (“CFR”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and the passing of the risk is the same as for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller must arrange and bear the cost of transporting the goods to the named port of destination. However, the seller is

 

 

 

not obliged to take out an insurance policy for the goods.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is identical as that for FOB.

 

Please note that many traders continue to use the traditional abbreviation ‘C&F’ when they refer to the above obligations. However any contract which says “C&F INCOTERMS” will be assumed to refer to the definition of C&F found in INCO-TERMS 1980. This definition is substan-tially different from the INCOTERMS 2010 definition of CRF. Thus it is strongly recommended that the parties use the cor-rect abbreviation i.e. CFR in order to avoid any unexpected confusion or dis-pute.

 

  1. Cost, Insurance      and     Freight

 

(“CIF”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and passing of risk for CIF is the same as that for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller is obligated to procure and bear the cost of transport and ‘minimum insur-ance cover of the Institute Cargo Clause’ for the goods in question to the named port of destination. If the buyer requires additional insurance they must bear the re-lating cost themselves.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is the same as that for CFR.

 

  1. Conclusion

 

When negotiating an international sales contract, both parties need to pay atten-tion to the trade terms. Each party must be aware of the extent of their responsi-bilities as agreeing to certain trade terms may result in additional costs. The IN-COTERMS can be very helpful in that they define each party’s exact responsibili-ties and risks and thus help to speed up the process of trade negotiations. How-ever, INCOTERMS should be applied carefully, specifically the parties should ensure that the exact version of INCO-TERMS used reflects their real intentions.

 

 

Responsibility

Warehouse

 

Storage

Export Packing

Loading

Charges

Inland Freight

Terminal

 

Charges

Forwarder’s

 

Fees

Loading Onto

Vessel

Ocean/Air

Freight

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Export

Charges On Ar-rival at Destina-tion

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Import


 

 

 

 

Ex Works/

Free On

Cost and

Cost, Insurance

EXW

Board/FOB

Freight/CFR

& Freight/CIF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 55 (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trade Terms in International Sale of Goods

 

and International Commercial Terms

(INCOTERMS)

 

 

 

March 2014

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. What are Trade Terms?

 

Every sale of goods contract should in-clude terms which govern key trade issues such as the time, place and manner of transfer for such goods. These terms are called “trade terms”. In other words trade terms set out the responsibilities of the buyer and seller in regards to the delivery of the goods in question e.g. method of delivery, payment of shipping costs, insur-ance and customs.

  1. The Use of Trade Terms

 

As noted above trade terms are used to govern various issues in regards to sales of goods transactions. Over the years stan-dardised predefined trade terms have been developed in order to reduce the nego-tiation time for such transactions. The most popular of these predefined terms are the ‘International Commercial Terms’ (INCOTERMS).

III. What are the International Com-mercial Terms (INCOTERMS)?

 

INCOTERMS were first introduced by the International Chamber of Commerce in 1936. The INCOTERMS consist of a list of standard trade terms (usually re-ferred to by their abbreviated title) and a set of international recognised rules on how such terms should be interpreted in practice. The purpose of the INCO-TERMS is to standardise the usage of trade terms in order to reduce uncertainty

 

 

and avoid disputes. The most recent ver-sion of the INCOTERMS was published in 2010. However older version can still be used if the parties so wish.

  1. Validity

 

INCOTERMS will only apply if their ap-plication is expressly stated in the sale of goods contract itself or in the relevant of-fer/quotation, general purchase and sale conditions, order, order confirmations etc. Moreover it is crucial that the aforemen-tioned reference specifically states which version of the INCOTERMS is applicable e.g. “INCOTERMS 2010.” Due to the dif-ferences between the different versions a reference to just “INCOTERMS” can cause numerous problems.

 

Template delivery clause: “delivery shall be CIF BANGKOK INCOTERMS 2010.

 

  1. What do the INCOTERMS cover?

 

The INCOTERMS define the rights and obligations of the parties with regard to:

 

  • Delivery and transportation docu-mentation (or equivalent electronic notifications);

 

  • Allocation of costs for freight, taxes, duties, insurance, etc.; and

 

  • Transfer of risk.

 

INCOTERMS do not govern:

 

  • The transfer of ownership and other rights arising from owner-ship;

 

 

  • Breaches of contract and the con-sequences thereof;

 

  • Description or quality of goods;

 

  • The timing and method of pay-ment;

 

  • Choice of law; or

 

  • Issues related to forwarders /car-riers.

VII. Categories of INCOTERMS

 

The INCOTERMS definitions are broadly divided into four groups as follows:

 

  • The E-terms (EXW) under which the seller’s only responsibility is to make the goods available to the buyer at the seller’s premises;

 

  • The F-terms (FCA, FAS and FOB) under which the seller must deliver the goods to a carrier who is ap-pointed by the buyer;

 

  • The C-terms (CFR, CIF, CPT and CIP) under which the seller must ar-range the transportation of the goods but does not assume the risk of loss or damage to the goods or of any additional costs which arise due to events which occur after ship-ment/dispatch; and

 

  • The D-terms (DAT, DAP, and DDP) under which the seller bears all the costs and risks of delivering the goods to their final destination.

VIII.  Most   Frequently    Used   INCO-

 

TERMS

 

Please note that the terms FOB and CFR which are discussed below mainly apply to

 

 

 

contracts which use maritime and inland waterway transport, however, they can also be agreed upon in case of air freight.

  1. Ex Works (“EXW”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The seller must pack the goods using ap-propriate packaging and then make the goods available at their premises for the buyer’s collection at the agreed time. If no specific location within the seller’s prem-ises has been agreed, then the seller may select the location which is most conven-ient for him. The risk of loss or damage to the goods passes to the buyer as soon as the seller fulfils the delivery obligation i.e. when the goods are placed at the buyer’s disposal.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller has no obligation in relation to transportation or insurance. The buyer is responsible for these matters.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The buyer must obtain any requisite ex-port and import documentation and com-plete all export and import custom for-malities at their own expense.

 

EXW places the least obligations on the seller, as the buyer has to bear all costs and risks involved in removing the goods from the seller’s premises.

 

  1. Free On Board (“FOB”)

(1) Delivery

 

Under this term the seller’s delivery obli-gation extends to ensuring that the goods (properly packaged) are safely placed on board the buyer’s appointed vessel in a manner which is customary for the port of shipment. As soon as the goods have passed over the ship’s rail the seller’s obli-gation is fulfilled. Up until that point the seller bears all the risks for the goods.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The vessel must be provided and con-tracted by the buyer at their own expense. Equally the buyer must arrange and bear the cost of any insurance coverage.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The seller must obtain any requisite ex-port documentation and complete all ex-port custom formalities at their own ex-pense. Equally the buyer must obtain any requisite import documentation and com-plete all import custom formalities at their own expense.

  1. Cost and Freight (“CFR”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and the passing of the risk is the same as for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller must arrange and bear the cost of transporting the goods to the named port of destination. However, the seller is

 

 

 

not obliged to take out an insurance policy for the goods.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is identical as that for FOB.

 

Please note that many traders continue to use the traditional abbreviation ‘C&F’ when they refer to the above obligations. However any contract which says “C&F INCOTERMS” will be assumed to refer to the definition of C&F found in INCO-TERMS 1980. This definition is substan-tially different from the INCOTERMS 2010 definition of CRF. Thus it is strongly recommended that the parties use the cor-rect abbreviation i.e. CFR in order to avoid any unexpected confusion or dis-pute.

 

  1. Cost, Insurance      and     Freight

 

(“CIF”)

 

(1) Delivery

 

The nature of delivery and passing of risk for CIF is the same as that for FOB.

 

(2) Transport and Insurance

 

The seller is obligated to procure and bear the cost of transport and ‘minimum insur-ance cover of the Institute Cargo Clause’ for the goods in question to the named port of destination. If the buyer requires additional insurance they must bear the re-lating cost themselves.

 

(3) Custom formalities

 

The nature of this obligation is the same as that for CFR.

 

  1. Conclusion

 

When negotiating an international sales contract, both parties need to pay atten-tion to the trade terms. Each party must be aware of the extent of their responsi-bilities as agreeing to certain trade terms may result in additional costs. The IN-COTERMS can be very helpful in that they define each party’s exact responsibili-ties and risks and thus help to speed up the process of trade negotiations. How-ever, INCOTERMS should be applied carefully, specifically the parties should ensure that the exact version of INCO-TERMS used reflects their real intentions.

 

Responsibility

Warehouse

 

Storage

Export Packing

Loading

Charges

Inland Freight

Terminal

 

Charges

Forwarder’s

 

Fees

Loading Onto

Vessel

Ocean/Air

Freight

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Export

Charges On Ar-rival at Destina-tion

Duty, Taxes & Customs Clear-ance for Import


 

 

 

 

Ex Works/

Free On

Cost and

Cost, Insurance

EXW

Board/FOB

Freight/CFR

& Freight/CIF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Seller

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Seller

Seller

Seller

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

Buyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No 056 (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hong Kong – Thailand

Double Taxation Agreement

 

 

March 2014

 

 

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and bro-chures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Li-ability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of infor-mation which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

A comprehensive Double Taxation Agreement (“DTA”) between the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (“Hong Kong”) and Thailand was signed on 7 September 2005. The agreement was the third of its kind for Hong Kong which now has a total of 14 DTAs after entering into 9 DTAs in 2010 alone.

  1. Scope of Application

 

The DTA applies to residents of Hong Kong and Thailand. The DTA classifies, among oth-ers, the following groups of people as Hong Kong residents:

 

  • Any individual who stays in Hong Kong for 180 days or more during the assessed year, or 300 days or more in two consecutive years:

 

  • A company which is either incorporated in Hong Kong or normally controlled and managed in Hong Kong.

 

Further the following will be classified as a “Permanent Establishments (“PE”) for DTA purposes:

 

  • A building site, a construction, assembly or installation project or supervisory in con-nection therewith, which lasts for a mini-mum of 6 months;

 

  • The provision of services that continues within the source country for a minimum of 6 months within a 12-month period.

 

 

 

III. Key Provisions

 

The key aspects of the DTA are described be-low:

  1. Taxation of business profits (Article 7)

 

In determining the profits of the resident com-pany:

 

  • Profit sharing arrangements are allowed.

 

  • Deductions

 

Expenses may be deducted if they were in-curred to support the resident company’s op-erations, including “executive and administra-tive expenses.”

 

Please note that remittance of profits by a branch office in Thailand to a Hong Kong head office is no longer subject to 10% Thai withholding tax.

  1. Taxation of dividends (Article 10)

 

The DTA provides that the country where the dividends originate can tax up to 10% of the gross amount. However, Hong Kong does not tax dividends under the current domestic tax law.

  1. Taxation of employment income

 

The DTA provisions regarding employment income differentiate between income derived from independent personal services and in-come derived from dependent personal ser-vices.

 

According to Article 14, income derived from independent personal services (e.g. engineering fees, lecture remuneration, etc.) is only taxable in the resident country, unless:

 

  • the person also has a ‘fixed base’ in the source country; or

 

  • the person is present in the source coun-try for at least 183 days within a 12-months period.

 

According to Article 15, income derived from dependent personal services (e.g. salaries, wages, etc.) in the source country will be tax-able only in the resident country if:

 

(3) the person is present in the source coun-try for less than 183 days in any 12-month period;

 

and

 

(4) the remuneration is paid by or on behalf of employer who is a non-resident of the source country;

 

and

 

  • the remuneration is not borne by the employer’s PE in the source country.

 

This however does not apply to Directors’ fees which may be taxed in the source coun-try.

 

 

 

 

  1. Impact on Trade

 

As aforementioned, residents of Hong Kong includes companies which are incorporated abroad (e.g. mainland China, the Cayman Is-lands and Bermuda) but which are managed from within Hong Kong.

 

For profit purposes the PE is treated as a sepa-rate enterprise thus only the profits attributable to that PE will be taxed in the resident country. However the DTA enables the PE to deduct expenses which have been incurred outside the resident country. This provision has helped to alleviate the problem of the Thai revenue au-thority’s tendency to impose restrictive cost al-location practices.

 

As Hong Kong, unlike most other countries, bases its taxation on strictly territorial terms, some Hong Kong residents may find that their employment income is not taxed in either the source country or the resident country.

 

As Hong Kong is one of Thailand’s major trading and investment partners this DTA has had a profound impact on international trade. The DTA provides investors with greater cer-tainty in regards to determining (and minimis-ing) their tax liability, and has thus facilitated increased business interaction between the two countries.

 

 

Newsletter No. 57 (EN)

 

 

 

 

The Thai Social Security System

 

December 2014

 

 

 

A l l r i g h t s r e s e r v e d © L o r e n z & P a r t n e r s  2 0 1 4

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information pro-vided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, in-cluding any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated de-liberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

  • Governing Law

 

The Social Security Scheme is operated accord-ing to the Social Security Act B.E. 2533 (A.D.1990) and its Amendments B.E. 2537 (A.D.1994) and B.E. 2542 (A.D.1999).

 

  • Members

 

In accordance with the laws concerned, despite the nationality of the person, a business entity which has at least one employee is obliged to subscribe to the system. Without any excep-tion, subscribers, whether foreigners or Thai, will enjoy all the same benefits under the scheme

 

III.   Contributions

 

The current rate of contributions to the Social Security Fund is 5% of the employee’s gross salary per month. These contributions are paid by both the employer and the employee (5% each). A supplement of 2.75% is paid by the government. In total the contribution to the Fund is 12.75 % per month.

 

The employee’s contribution is deducted from the salary. The monthly remuneration on which the above rates apply is capped at THB 15,000 (approx. EUR 365). In other words, the maximum amount to be de-ducted is THB 750 (approx. EUR 18). In addition to the employee’s contribution, the employer pays his contribution under the same scheme as the employee. Both contri-butions must be submitted to the Social Se-curity Office within the 15th day of the fol-lowing month.

 

  1. Benefits

 

All below benefits will be awarded in case that the employee uses the hospital which is shown in the medical card issued by the So-cial Security Office.

 

  • Accident, sickness, child birth, dental treatment

 

In case of accident or sickness, medical ser-vice is free of charge except extra facilities required by the employee himself. In case of childbirth, effective from 1 January 2011, the applicant is eligible to receive THB 13,000 (approx. EUR 317) per child for 2 children in total. If the spouse is also an ap-plicant, they are eligible to receive reim-bursement for a total of 4 births. For com-pensation for the loss of income resulting from all mentioned cases, the employee gets 50% of his salary which again is capped at THB 15,000 for a maximum of 90 days per incident. For dental treatment, effective from 1 January 2011, the applicant is eligible to reimbursement for the following medial treatment: extraction of teeth, filling teeth, and removal of dental plaque up to THB 300 (approx. EUR 7) per case and not over THB 600 (approx. EUR 14) per year. Addi-tionally, the applicant is also entitled to re-imbursement for acrylic-based overdenture from 1 to 5 teeth at a cost not exceeding THB 1,300 (approx. EUR 31), and overden-ture for more than 5 teeth at a cost not ex-ceeding THB 1,500 (approx. EUR 36).

Disability

 

Medical services in case of disability are free at governmental hospitals. In case of private hospitals, the medical service is free of charge up to the amount of THB 2,000 (approx. EUR 48) per month for the Outpa-tient Department and up to the amount of THB 4,000 (approx. EUR 97) for the Inpa-

 

 

 

 

 Lorenz & Partners

2014

Page 2 of 3

 

Tel.: +66 (0) 2–287 1882  e-mail: info@lorenz-partners.com

 

 

 

 

L&P

Newsletter No. 57  (EN)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legal, Tax and Business Consultants

 

 

 

tient Department. All additional costs have to be paid by the employee. The compensa-tion for the loss of income (50% of the monthly salary capped at THB 15,000) is not limited to a certain period of time.

Death

In case of death, funeral expenses up to an amount of THB 40,000 (approx. EUR 975) are paid by the Social Security Fund. If the employee has paid contributions to the so-cial security system for at least 36 months, his family or any other person specified by the employee will get a onetime payment amounting to 1.5 times the last monthly sal-ary of the deceased employee. If the em-ployee contributed to the social security sys-tem for ten years or more, his family or any other specified person will get a onetime payment of 5 times the last monthly salary of the deceased employee.

Children

 

As from 1 January 2011, the limit of child al-lowance has been increased from THB 350 to 400 (EUR 8 to 9) per child per month for a maximum of 2 children under the age of 6 years.

Pension benefits

 

With regard to pension benefits, each period of time in which contributions to the social security system have been made needs to be looked at separately.

 

 

Employees who have paid contributions for less than 180 months do not receive retire-ment pay. If they are 55 years of age or be-come disabled, they get a onetime payment amounting to the sum of the contributions they have made to the social security system plus interest which will be fixed each year (e.g. 2013: 4.27%). In the case of death their families receive the money.

 

An employee who has paid contributions for at least 180 months will receive retirement pay which is 20% of the average monthly salary for the last 60 months plus 1.5% of the average monthly salary multiplied by the number of years he has paid contributions for over 180 months.

 

If the employee dies before receiving any re-tirement pay, his family will receive the sum of the contributions to the social security system made by him and by his employer. If he has already received retirement pay for less than 60 months, his family will get a onetime payment amounting to 10 retire-ment payments.

Unemployment benefits

In the case of unemployment, the former employee gets 30% of his salary for a maxi-mum of 90 days if he resigned, and 50% of his salary for up to 180 days in case of ter-mination. However, the salary on which such percentage is based is capped at THB 15,000.

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 58 (DE)

 

 

 

 

Errichtung einer Vertriebs- und Verkaufsgesellschaft in Hongkong

 

Januar 2015

 

 

 Obwohl Lorenz & Partners größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwendet, die in diesem Newsletter bereit-gestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners über-nimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestell-ten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grund-sätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

Gegenstand der nachfolgenden Ausfüh-rungen sind Gesellschaftsgründungen in Hongkong unter verschiedenen Vor-aussetzungen, dargestellt an Fallbeispielen, um zu zeigen, wie sich das deutsche und das Hong Konger Steuerrecht auf die ver-schiedenen Situationen auswirkt und wie dies steueroptimiert genutzt werden kann.

 

  1. Fall 1: Errichtung einer Vertriebs-und Verkaufsgesellschaft

 

Ein deutsches Maschinenbauunternehmen verkauft Maschinen nach Südostasien. Nach Bestellung durch den asiatischen Kunden werden standardmäßig Maschi-nen, die teilweise in Deutschland auf La-ger sind und teilweise in Deutschland neu hergestellt werden, direkt an den Kunden nach Asien versendet.

 

Der Kunde zahlt direkt an das deutsche Unternehmen. Der hierbei entstehende Gewinn wird in Deutschland einem Ge-samtsteuersatz von ca. 30 % (KSt, GewSt, SolZ) unterworfen; vom gesamten Ge-winn verbleiben somit nur 70 %.

 

Die Besteuerung kann allerdings durch steuerlich attraktivere Strukturierung auf ein wesentlich geringeres Maß gesenkt werden.

 

Zu überlegen wäre, unter dem Dach der deutschen Mutter eine Gesellschaft in Hongkong zu gründen, die das gesamte asiatische Geschäft übernimmt und insbe-sondere folgende Funktionen hat:

 

  • Auftragsannahme der asiatischen Kun-den

 

  • Vertragsschluss im eigenen Namen

 

 

  • Auftragsdurchführung inkl. Fracht-Handling

 

  • Übernahme eigener Risiken (Preisge-fahr, Delkredere, usw.)

 

  • Rechnungsstellung, Mahnwesen etc.
  • After-Sales-Services
  • Marktanalyse und -beobachtung
  • Verkaufsplanung

 

Hierbei ist die Idee, dass die Hongkonger Gesellschaft das Geschäft in Asien kon-trolliert, die Aufträge entgegennimmt und durchführt. Letztendlich wird das deut-sche Mutterhaus von der Hongkonger Gesellschaft lediglich beauftragt, die Ma-schinen herzustellen und diese gegebe-nenfalls direkt an die Endkunden in Asien zu liefern.

 

Die Hongkonger Gesellschaft stellt die Lieferung dem Kunden in Asien in Rech-nung. Die Unternehmung in Hongkong kann so strukturiert werden, dass der ge-nerierte Gewinn in Hongkong aus dieser Konstruktion mit 0 % besteuert wird, da Hongkong, im Gegensatz zu Deutschland und den meisten anderen Ländern, ledig-lich Gewinne versteuert, die in Hongkong generiert werden (sog. Onshore-Gewinne). Gewinne, die außerhalb von Hongkong generiert wurden, sind in Hongkong grundsätzlich steuerfrei (Offshore-Gewinne). Soweit also die Ge-winne der Vertriebs- und Verkaufsgesell-schaft unter die Kriterien fallen, die in Hongkong eine Behandlung als „Offs-hore-Gewinne“ rechtfertigen, entfällt eine Besteuerung in Hongkong.

 

Die Gewinne können unter Anwendung von § 8b Abs. 1, 5 KStG sodann von der Hongkonger Gesellschaft nach Deutsch-land (fast) steuerneutral weitergeleitet wer-den, da Dividendenausschüttungen in Hongkong quellensteuerfrei sind.

 

Ergebnis:

  • Erhöhte Kundennähe
  • Schnellere Marktbearbeitung

 

  • bei einem Gesamtgewinn von 1.000.000 EUR ergibt sich eine Steu-erersparnis von ungefähr 250.000 EUR (abzüglich ggf. höherer Kosten in Hongkong; hierdurch wird aber auch ggf. eine schnellere und bessere Marktbearbeitung durch Kundennähe möglich)

 

  1. Fall 2: Errichtung einer (Einkaufs-) Gesellschaft

 

Eine deutsche Gesellschaft kauft regelmä-ßig Güter und Waren in Asien ein, die dann direkt an diverse deutsche und an-dere europäische Kunden geliefert wer-den. Die deutsche Gesellschaft vergütet die Hersteller direkt. Der durch den Wei-terverkauf generierte Gewinn wird in Deutschland mit rund 30 % besteuert.

 

Bei diesem Szenario kann eine Hongkon-ger Einkaufsgesellschaft gegründet wer-den, die folgende Funktionen hat:

 

  • Wareneinkauf in eigenem Namen

 

  • Abwicklung des Einkaufs und Koor-dination

 

  • Qualitätskontrolle
  • Marktbearbeitung
  • Bestellungskoordination
  • Akkreditiv

 

einkauft, die Qualität kontrolliert und da-für verantwortlich ist, dass die Produkte jeweils direkt an den Endkunden geliefert werden. Es käme in Betracht, der deut-schen Gesellschaft vor diesem Hinter-grund eine Verkaufsprovision zu zahlen und so einen Teil des Profits nach Deutschland abzuführen. Ansonsten kann erreicht werden, dass die in Hongkong generierten Gewinne insgesamt mit 0 % besteuert werden (sog. Offshore-Gewinne), siehe oben.

 

III. Steuerrechtliche Konsequenzen

 

Im Wesentlichen lassen sich bei diesen Fallgestaltungen zwei Problemfelder aus-machen, welche die §§ 1 und 7ff. Außen-steuergesetz (AStG) (in der Fassung vom 26. Juni 2013) betreffen.

 

  • 1 AStG will verhindern, dass Geschäfte einer deutschen Muttergesellschaft (M) mit ihrer ausländischen Tochtergesell-schaft (T) zum Nachteil des deutschen Fiskus durchgeführt werden. Das Ge-schäft soll steuerlich so gewürdigt werden, als hätte das Geschäft unter fremden Drit-ten stattgefunden (sog. Fremdvergleichs-grundsatz).

 

 

Das Konzept einer solchen Unterneh-mensgründung beinhaltet, dass die Hong-konger Gesellschaft zentral in Südostasien

 

 

 

 

  • 1 Abs. 1 AStG: Berichtigung von Einkünften

 

 

  1. Tatbestand

 

 1.) Minderung inländischer Einkünfte eines (un-)beschränkt Steuerpflichtigen,

 

 2.) durch bestehende Geschäftsbeziehung zum Ausland,

 

= jede schuldrechtliche Beziehung, die nicht auf einem Gesellschaftsvertrag beruht

 

 3.) mit einer nahestehenden Person,

 

= Beteiligung zu mind. 25 % oder beherrschender Einfluss (gleichgültig aus und in welcher Richtung)

 

 4.) die einem Fremdvergleich nicht standhalten.

 

 

  1. Rechtsfolge

 

 Berichtigung der inländischen Einkünfte nach Fremdvergleichsgrundsätzen.

 

 

III. Beispiel

 

 M verkauft Waren an T zum Preis von 100, obwohl M bei seinen (fremden) Kunden einen  Preis von 157 durchsetzen kann. Dies führt bei M zu einer außerbilanziellen Gewinnhinzu-

 rechnung von 57.

 

 

Die Problematik besteht darin, den Preis zu bestimmen, der auch unter fremden Dritten zu Stande gekommen wäre (sog. Drittpreis). Insbesondere bei steuerlichen Außenprüfungen ist dies regelmäßig ein Streitpunkt.

 

Hierfür ist es unerlässlich, fortlaufende Dokumentationen zu führen, die die An-wendung eines gewählten Ver-rechnungspreises stützen und welche von den Finanzbehörden anerkannt werden. Es gibt inzwischen Dienstleister, die sich darauf spezialisiert haben, in weltweiten Datenbanken nach entsprechenden Ver-gleichspreisen zu suchen und dann für den Kunden entsprechende Dokumentationen zu erstellen

 

Ohne solche Dokumentationsnachweise wird man einer Schätzung des Finanzam-tes kaum erfolgreich entgegen treten kön-nen. Weiterhin bestimmt § 90 Abs. 3 der Abgabenordnung (AO) dass Unterneh-men bei Sachverhalten mit Auslandsbezug

 

eine Aufzeichnungspflicht trifft, welche bei Nichtbeachtung Sanktionen nach sich zieht (§ 162 AO).

 

Es ist somit dringend anzuraten, Gründe, die einen Preis unterhalb des Drittpreises rechtfertigen können, zu dokumentieren.

 

Dies können unter anderem sein:

  • fehlendes Delkredererisiko,

 

  • eingesparter Verwaltungsaufwand kann anderweitig verwendet werden,

 

  • große Abnahmemengen der Tochter,

 

  • Sicherstellung des Absatzes durch langfristige Verträge.

 

Dies macht deutlich, dass in der Thematik

 

„Verrechnungspreise“ ein enormer Spiel-raum steckt, der im konkreten Fall einzel-wirtschaftlich erfolgreich genutzt werden kann jedoch auch immer einer Betrach-tung im Einzelfall bedarf.

 

  • 7 AStG und die folgenden §§ 8 – 14 AStG wollen verhindern, dass ein Steuer-pflichtiger seine Geschäftstätigkeit in eine ausländische Gesellschaft verlagert und die erzielten Gewinne somit einer niedri-geren Besteuerung unterworfen werden als in Deutschland. Im Kern will der Steu-ergesetzgeber die Einschaltung von sog. Zwischengesellschaften (auch „Briefkas-tenfirmen“ genannt) unterbinden, die in der Realität keinen ordentlichen Ge-schäftsbetrieb unterhalten oder die Ge-schäfte de facto von Deutschland aus ge-steuert werden (d.h. es besteht eine Wei-

 

sungsgebundenheit der ausländischen Ge-sellschaft).

 

Als Rechtsfolge werden die im Ausland erzielten Gewinne, obwohl diese in einer rechtlich selbständigen Gesellschaft ent-standen sind, dem Gesellschafter in Deutschland als eigene Einkünfte zuge-rechnet, der diese dann in Deutschland als eigene Einkünfte zu versteuern hat. Da die Einkünfte in der Regel bereits im Her-kunftsland versteuert wurden, kann dies zu einer echten Doppelbesteuerung füh-ren.

 

 

  • 7 Abs. 1 AStG: Steuerpflicht inländischer Gesellschafter

 

 

  1. Tatbestand

 

 1.) Beteiligung eines unbeschränkt Steuerpflichtigen,

 

 2.) an einer ausländischen Kapitalgesellschaft,

 

= jede Körperschaft i.S.d. § KStG ohne Geschäftsleitung oder Sitz in Deutschland

 

 3.) zu mehr als 50% und

 

 4.) ausländische Gesellschaft ist Zwischengesellschaft gem. § 8 Abs. 1 AStG

 

a.) niedrigere Besteuerung (d.h. Ertragsteuern von weniger als 25%) und

 

b.) Einkünfte stammen nicht aus einer aktiven Tätigkeit, d.h.

 

>> es wird kein in kaufmännischer Weise eingerichteter Geschäftsbetrieb unterhalten,

 

>> keine Teilnahme am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr oder

 

>> Vorbereitung, Abschluss und Durchführung des Geschäftes unter Mitwirkung des unbeschränkt Steuerpflichtigen.

 

 

  1. Rechtsfolge

 

 Einkünfte der ausländischen Kapitalgesellschaft sind den inländischen

 

 Gesellschaftern nach Beteiligungsquote zuzurechnen.

 

 

Im Verhältnis zu § 1 AStG gilt jedoch, dass § 7 AStG nachrangig anzuwenden ist (vgl. Urteil des Bundesfinanzhofs vom 19.03.2002, Aktenzeichen I R 4/01).

 

Zur Klarstellung: Die beiden Normen schließen sich aber deshalb nicht gegensei-tig aus. Auch bei einer Anwendung des § 1 AStG kann § 7 AStG eingreifen, allerdings

 

dürfen sich die hieraus gezogenen Rechts-folgen insgesamt nur einmal nieder-schlagen.

 

Damit die Rechtsfolgen des § 7 AStG nicht eingreifen, müssen die Beziehungen zwischen deutscher und ausländischer Ge-sellschaft rechtlich und tatsächlich in der Weise ausgestaltet sein, dass die ausländische Gesellschaft weitestgehend unabhän-gig am Markt agieren kann; es muss sich um eine sog. aktive Gesellschaft handeln.

 

Diese Voraussetzung kann objektiv ge-schaffen werden und ist nicht vom sub-jektiven Empfinden der Finanzverwaltung abhängig. Auch für die Annahme eines Gestaltungsmissbrauchs ist kein Raum, da § 7 AStG dem Steuerpflichtigen die Vo-raussetzungen ausdrücklich nennt, die für eine Nichtanwendung der Norm erfüllt sein müssen. Der Sachverhalt ist also vom Steuerpflichtigen gestaltbar, so dass bei guter Planung das Risiko einer weiteren Besteuerung in Deutschland ausge-schlossen werden kann.

 

Damit eine ausländische Gesellschaft als sog. aktive Gesellschaft anerkannt wird müssen folgende Voraussetzungen kumu-lativ erfüllt sein:

 

  • die ausländische Gesellschaft muss einen in kaufmännischer Weise ein-gerichteten Geschäftsbetrieb un-terhalten (sog. Qualifizierter Ge-schäftsbetrieb) UND

 

  • die zur Vorbereitung, zum Abschluss und zur Ausführung der Geschäfte gehörenden Tätigkeiten müssen ohne die „schädliche“ Mitwirkung“ des

Steuerpflichtigen   ausgeübt   werden

 

UND

 

  • die ausländische Gesellschaft muss am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Ver-kehr teilnehmen.

 

Grundsätzlich kann das erste Aktivmerk-mal a) durch eine entsprechende Ausstat-tung der Gesellschaft mit Büroräumen, Personal etc. erfüllt werden, was auch rela-tiv einfach nachweisbar ist.

 

Jedoch ist es für die Gewährleistung von Aktiveinkünften wichtig, dass die Gesell-schaft ohne die Mitwirkung des Steuer-pflichtigen agiert und auch am allgemei-nen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr teilnimmt.

 

Zu b)

 

Eine Person (der Steuerpflichtige) wirkt an einem Handelsgeschäft der ausländi-schen Gesellschaft mit, wenn sie Tätigkei-ten ausübt, die nach ihrer Funktion Teil der Vorbereitung, des Abschlusses oder der Ausführung der in Betracht stehenden Geschäfte dieser Gesellschaft sind. Dies gilt auch dann, wenn das Entgelt für diese Leistungen wie unter unabhängigen Drit-ten bemessen worden ist.

 

Fallen im Rahmen einer aktiven Handels-tätigkeit einzelne Geschäfte von unterge-ordneter Bedeutung an, an denen ein In-landsbeteiligter oder eine nahe stehende Person mitwirkt, kann insoweit eine Prü-fung ob passiver Erwerb vorliegt unter-bleiben. Es ist jedoch § 1 AStG zu beach-ten. Eine Person wirkt mit, wenn sie z.B. für die ausländische Gesellschaft den Ver-trieb übernimmt, den Vertretereinsatz lei-tet, deren Finanzierungsaufgaben über-nimmt oder deren Handelsrisiko trägt1.

 

Zu c)

 

Die Rechtsprechung hat für die Definie-rung des Merkmals „Teilnahme am allge-meinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr“ fol-gende Kasuistik entwickelt:

 

Mit Urteil vom 9. Juli 1986 (I R 85/83) BStBl. 1986 II S. 851 hat der BFH ent-schieden, dass eine Beteiligung am allge-meinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr eine Tä-tigkeit erfordert, die gegen Entgelt an den Markt gebracht und für Dritte äußerlich erkennbar angeboten wird.

 

Es muss nach dem Wortlaut zwischen der Teilnahme am “wirtschaftlichen Verkehr” und der Teilnahme am “allgemeinen Ver-kehr” unterschieden werden. Das Haupt-gewicht der Begriffsbestimmung liegt auf der Teilnahme am “allgemeinen Verkehr”.

 

 

1 BMF-Schreiben vom 2. Dezember 1994, – IV C

7 – S 1340 – 20/94 -.

 

 

Eine Teilnahme am “wirtschaftlichen Verkehr” ist schon dann gegeben, wenn ein Steuerpflichtiger mit Gewinnerzie-lungsabsicht nachhaltig am Leistungs-oder Güteraustausch teilnimmt. Das Merkmal dient dazu, aus dem Gewerbe-betrieb solche Tätigkeiten auszu-klammern, die zwar von einer Gewinner-zielungsabsicht getragen werden, aber nicht auf einen Leistungs- oder Güteraus-tausch gerichtet sind.

 

Die Teilnahme am “allgemeinen Ver-kehr” erfordert dagegen, dass die Tätig-keit des Steuerpflichtigen nach außen hin in Erscheinung tritt und sich an eine – wenn auch begrenzte – Allgemeinheit wendet. Entscheidend ist deshalb darauf abzustellen, ob für außenstehende Dritte der Wille erkennbar wird, ein Gewerbe zu betreiben. Dagegen ist es nicht erforder-lich, dass der Steuerpflichtige seine Leis-tungen oder Waren einer Mehrzahl von Interessenten anbietet bzw. Angebote der-selben annimmt. Auch die Tätigkeit für nur einen bestimmten Vertragspartner kann Teilnahme am allgemeinen wirt-schaftlichen Verkehr sein.

 

Mit Urteil vom 29 August 1984 (I R 68/81) hat der BFH bestätigt, dass eine Beteili-gung am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr nicht vorliegt, wenn die Dienste innerhalb eines Konzerns erbracht werden und die Beschränkung auf der inneren Konzernstruktur beruht.

 

  • 1 der Gewerbesteuer-Durchführungs-verordnung stellt für die Definition des Gewerbebetriebs auf den Begriff der Teil-nahme am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr ab. Wenn der Gesetzgeber den Begriff im AStG verwendet, muss – man-gels anderer Anhaltspunkte – davon aus-gegangen werden, dass der Begriff so zu verwenden ist, wie ihn die Recht-sprechung entwickelt hat.

 

Eine Teilnahme am allgemeinen wirt-schaftlichen Verkehr kann nur dann vor-

 

liegen, wenn der Geschäftsbetrieb auf ei-nen Wechsel bei den Kunden angelegt ist. Dies ist z.B. zu bejahen, wenn der Unter-nehmer seine Betätigung auf einen be-stimmten Kundenkreis beschränkt, ohne sich auf einen fest begrenzten Perso-nenkreis festzulegen.

 

Würde dagegen die Auslandsgesellschaft einen für das Bewirken der in Rede ste-henden Dienstleistungen eingerichteten Geschäftsbetrieb unterhalten, welcher dar-auf angelegt ist, Dienstleistungen nur ge-genüber der Inlandsgesellschaft zu erbrin-gen, wird von der Auslandsgesellschaft kein Geschäftsbetrieb unter Teilnahme am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr un-terhalten.

 

Nach Ansicht des BMF, festgesetzt im

 

Schreiben betreffend Grundsätze zur Anwendung des Außensteuergesetzes vom 14. Mai 2004 (IV B 4 – S 1340 – 11-04), liegt eine Teilnahme am allgemeinen wirtschaftlichen Verkehr dann vor, wenn sich die Gesellschaft in ih-rem Geschäftsbetrieb bei den in Betracht stehenden Handelsgeschäften in nicht nur unerheblichem Umfang an eine unbe-stimmte Zahl von Personen wendet. Da-bei genügt es, wenn sich die Gesellschaft nur beim Verkauf oder beim Einkauf der Ware an eine unbestimmte Anzahl von Personen wendet, die Ware aber aus-schließlich von einem ihr nahe stehenden Unternehmen bezieht oder an ein solches Unternehmen liefert.

 

Eine Teilnahme am wirtschaftlichen Ver-kehr liegt auch dann vor, wenn sich die unbestimmte Anzahl der Kunden auf-grund des Gegenstandes der in Betracht stehenden Geschäftstätigkeit auf einen en-gen Personenkreis beschränkt. Ebenso ist die Begrenzung auf einen engen Kunden-kreis unschädlich, wenn sich die ausländi-sche Gesellschaft nicht auf einen fest be-grenzten Personenkreis festlegt, sondern ihr Geschäftsbetrieb auf Kundenwechsel angelegt ist.

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 62 (EN)

 

 

 

 

Demand Guarantees

and

Unfair Calling of Guarantees

 

 

 

November 2015

 

 

 

 

Al l ri gh t s res erved © Loren z & Part n ers 2 01 5

 

Although Lorenz & Partners always pays great attention on updating information provided in newsletters and brochures we cannot take responsibility for the completeness, correctness or quality of the information provided. None of the information contained in this newsletter is meant to replace a personal consultation with a qualified lawyer. Liability claims, regarding damage caused by the use or disuse of any information provided, including any kind of information which is incomplete or incorrect, will therefore be rejected, if not generated deliberately or grossly negligent.

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

In international trade, importers are particu-larly exposed to the risk that the exporter is not able to perform its contractual duties. Besides the commercial risks of insolvency and protracted default, the exporter may be-come incapable of performing his duties due to the risks attached to selling to public or private entities in territories where political factors may have an impact. Some such po-litical risks are the cancellation of import or export licenses, the imposition of embargos or frustration of contract due to war or con-fiscation.

 

Importers in international trade therefore of-ten wish to have a security that the exporter will fulfil his obligations. In order to secure the contract, an exporter may be required to provide a guarantee that takes the form of a Demand Guarantee. Demand Guarantees provide protection to the importer against late, defective or non-performance by the exporter or contractor. Many contractors is-sue guarantees in the form of tender guaran-tees (also “bid guarantees”), advance pay-ment or stage payment guarantees, perform-ance or retention bonds.

 

Demand Guarantees must be differentiated from another financial instrument used in international trade, the Letter of Credit (“L/C”). L/Cs provide security for the ex-porter against non-payment. 1 The typical Demand Guarantee, however, is issued in order to reduce the risk of non-performance. This newsletter is meant to

 

 

1 For more information on L/Cs and other in-struments to secure performance and obligations under contracts, please refer to our Nerwsletter No. 13.

 

 

 

give a short overview on the characteristics and risks of Demand Guarantees.

 

  • Legal Nature and Features of De-mand Guarantees

 

A Demand Guarantee is a contract by which a guarantor, usually a bank or another fi-nancing institution, undertakes to pay to the importer/employer a sum of money up to the maximum quoted amount on the De-mand Guarantee upon representation of a demand together with any other documents specified under the terms of the bank’s guarantee.

 

  • The Contractual Relations: Direct and Indirect Guarantees

 

A Demand Guarantee can be issued as a Di-rect or Indirect Guarantee. Whereas in the constellation of a direct guarantee three sub-jects are involved, there are four subjects en-gaged in an Indirect Guarantee.

 

A Direct Guarantee is provided by the ex-porter’s bank to the importer/employer (beneficiary) directly. In this case there are three contracts:

 

  • the underlying contract, between the exporter/contractor and the im-porter/employer (e.g. a sales contract, (plant) construction contract or a con-tract for services);

 

  • the reimbursement contract between the exporter/contractor and his bank; and

 

  • the actual Demand Guarantee between the bank and the importer/employer.

 

 

The structure of the contractual relations in a Direct Guarantee can be seen in Appen-dix 1 below.

In the case of an Indirect Guarantee, the guarantee is provided by the importer’ s own bank. The exporter’s bank (instructing bank) instructs the importer’s bank (issuing bank) to issue the guarantee in favour of the bene-ficiary. It is the issuing bank only that as-sumes the obligations of the guarantor. It does not act as an agent of the instructing bank. In this case, there are four contracts. There neither is a contractual relationship between the beneficiary and the instructing bank nor between the exporter and the issu-ing bank.

 

The structure of the contractual relations in an Indirect Guarantee can be seen in Ap-pendix 1 below.

 

  • Legislation Governing Demand Guarantees

 

The characteristics of a Demand Guarantee depend on the applicable legislation and ju-risdiction. In general, a bank guarantee will contain a provision stating the choice of law. In absence of such provision, conflicts of law provisions will most often provide that the location of the bank’s office will be the decisive criterion regarding the applicable law, since the bank renders the characteristic main service (Art. 34 (a) Uniform Rules for Demand Guarantees; “URDG”).

 

In addition to the national law, the Interna-tional Chamber of Commerce (“ICC”) has published several sets of example rules con-cerning Demand Guarantees: The “Uniform

 

Rules for Contract Guarantees” of 1978 (Publication No. 325) did not gain wide ac-ceptance. In 1992, the “Uniform Rules for Demand Guarantees” were issued, and in 2010 a revised version of the URDG (Publi-cation No. 758) was released. Although not used frequently, it is recommended to incor-porate them in international contracts since these rules state the most common and widely used practice in international trade.

 

 

Under German law and the URDG (Art. 5

 

(a) URDG), the main feature of a Demand Guarantee is that it is legally independent from the underlying contract between the exporter/contractor and the im-porter/employer, i.e. it is an abstract pay-ment undertaking.

 

In general, payment must be made upon calling of the guarantee, e.g. upon presenta-tion of a written demand that complies with the provisions of the Demand Guarantee. Many Demand Guarantees are payable on first demand without any additional docu-ments (so-called First Demand Guarantees). This reflects their origin in replacing cash deposits. However, First Demand Guaran-tees more and more require at least a state-ment indicating that the exporter/contractor is in breach of the underlying contract (al-though this is contradictory to their nature of being payable on first demand).

 

III. Special Risks of Demand Guar-antees: Unfair Calling and Expiration

 

There are two major risks inherent in De-mand Guarantees: Unfair calling of the guarantee and the absence of an expiration date of the guarantee.

 

  1. Unfair Calling

 

Since the Demand Guarantee is legally sepa-rate from the underlying contract, it contains the risk of being called for unfairly although the underlying contract’s conditions have been fulfilled. The URDG does not contain provisions regarding this case. Therefore, it depends on the jurisprudence and the leg-islation of the applicable national law to de-termine in which case a payment request is regarded to be unfair, giving the ex-porter/contractor a chance to prevent the bank from paying out the guarantee sum.

 

Under German (procedural) law, the ex-porter/contractor may seek a “provisional injunction” (Einstweilige Verfügung) against the bank. However, the injunction will only be issued in case the beneficiary obviously misuses his position. In other jurisdictions, there are no legal remedies at hand to pre-vent unfair calling of Demand Guarantees. Apart from that, experience shows that legal actions prior to calling are frequently not successful.

 

  1. Expiration

 

A clear expiry date should be stated in the Demand Guarantee. The URDG contain a set of expiry provisions. A standard clause is:

 

This guarantee shall expire, even if this document is not returned, on … at the latest.” However, some countries, especially in the Middle East, may not accept a Demand Guarantee which includes an expiry date as this may not be enforceable under local laws. Further, cases are known where exporters/con-tractors were pushed to extend the expira-tion date, by threatening to call the Demand Guarantee.

 

  1. Insurance

 

The risk of unfair calling (as well as of fair calling, e.g. where the contract would not be performed for political reasons, such as non-renewal of export licenses) may be insured. The insurers range from national export credit agencies to private insurers. Although unfair calling of a guarantee does not occur often, in certain cases it may be recom-mendable to seek insurance coverage.

 

 

  1. Summary

 

Special prudence should be exerted when drafting the Demand Guarantee. Critical cir-cumstances are the expiration of the guaran-tee, the choice of law and its legal separation from the underlying contract. Especially when doing business in regions where the performance of a contract depends on po-litical impact; it might be recommendable to take out an unfair calling insurance.

 

 

Appendix 1

 

The structure of the contractual relations in a Direct Guarantee

 

 

 

Underlying

Contract

Exporter                   Importer

(Principal)                                                                            (Beneficiary)

 

 

Reimbursement

 

Contract

 

Guarantee

 

 

Bank

(Guarantor)

 

 

 

 

 

The structure of the contractual relations in an Indirect Guarantee

 

 

 

Underlying

Contract

 

Exporter

Importer

(Principal)

(Beneficiary)

 

 

 

Reimbursement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guarantee

 

 

Contract

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written Payment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exporter’s Bank

 

Order

 

Importer’s Bank

 

 

 

(Instructing Bank)

 

 

 

(Issuing Bank)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newsletter No. 63 (DE)

 

 

 

 

Die Besteuerung von Miet- und Zinseinkünften

 

bei beschränkt Steuerpflichtigen in Deutschland

 

 

 

November 2015

 

 

 

All rights reserved © Lorenz & Partners 2015

 

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners Ltd. größtmögliche Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesem Newsletter bereitgestellten Informationen stets auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie darauf hinweisen, dass dieser eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen kann. Lorenz & Partners Ltd. übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit, Vollständigkeit oder Qualität der bereitgestellten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners Ltd., welche sich auf Schäden materieller oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informationen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informatio-nen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners Co Ltd. kein vorsätzli-ches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

Gemäß § 1 Abs. 4 EStG sind natürliche Perso-nen, die in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland weder einen Wohnsitz noch einen gewöhnli-chen Aufenthalt haben, beschränkt einkom-mensteuerpflichtig, wenn sie inländische Ein-künfte im Sinne des § 49 EStG erzielen.

 

  • Beschränkt steuerpflichtige Einkünfte aus Vermietung und Verpachtung

 

Gemäß § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 6 EStG unterliegen Einkünfte aus Vermietung und Verpachtung im Sinne des § 21 EStG der beschränkten Steuerpflicht. Unter die Regelung des § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 6 EStG fallen Vermietungen und Ver-pachtungen von unbeweglichem Vermögen, wie beispielsweise die Vermietung von Grund-stücken, Gebäuden etc., von Sachinbegriffen oder von Rechten.

 

Sofern die Vermietungseinkünfte als gewerbli-che Einkünfte zu qualifizieren sind (gewerbli-che Vermietung, Vermietung durch Kapitalge-sellschaft), ergibt sich die beschränkte Steuer-pflicht aus § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 2 f EStG. Sie um-fasst Einkünfte aus der Vermietung und Ver-pachtung sowie aus der Veräußerung von in-ländischem unbeweglichem Vermögen.

 

Sonstige Einkünfte aus der Veräußerung von inländischen Grundstücken unterliegen gem. § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 8 EStG ebenfalls der be-schränkten Steuerpflicht, sofern zwischen An-schaffung und Veräußerung die „Spekulations-frist“ von zehn Jahren unterschritten wird (§ 23 Abs. 1 Nr. 1 EStG).

 

  1. a) Ermittlung der Einkünfte

 

Die Einkünfte aus Vermietung und Verpach-tung sind als Überschuss der Einnahmen über die Werbungskosten zu ermitteln. Die

 

Einkünfteermittlung erfolgt auf der Grundlage des Zu- und Abflussprinzips (§ 11 EStG).

 

Reisekosten des Steuerpflichtigen, der zur Si-cherung der Mieteinkünfte Reisen zu seinem inländischen Grundstück unternimmt, sind den inländischen Einkünften zuzuordnen und ab-ziehbar. Ebenfalls abziehbar sind grundsätzlich Absetzungen für Abnutzung (in der Regel 2% p. a.).

 

  1. b) Steuererhebung

 

Die Steuererhebung von beschränkt Steuer-pflichtigen bei Erzielung von Einkünften aus der Vermietung erfolgt im Wege der Veranla-gung, da kein Steuerabzug i. S. d. § 50a EStG vorgenommen wird. Gemäß § 25 Abs. 3 EStG hat die steuerpflichtige Person für den Veran-lagungszeitraum eine eigenständig unterschrie-bene Einkommensteuererklärung abzugeben. Zuständig ist das Finanzamt, in dessen Bezirk sich das Vermögen (also z.B. die Immobilie) bzw. der wertvollste Teil des Vermögens be-findet.

 

Der Vorteil der Abgabe einer Steuererklärung besteht darin, dass der Steuerpflichtige sämtli-che Werbungskosten geltend machen kann, die in wirtschaftlichem Zusammenhang mit den deutschen Einkünften aus Vermietung und Verpachtung stehen, § 50 Abs. 1 S. 1 EStG.

 

Nach § 149 Abs. 1 S. 2 AO ist darüber hinaus jeder zur Abgabe einer Steuererklärung ver-pflichtet, der hierzu von der Finanzbehörde aufgefordert wird.

 

  1. c) Einschränkungen durch DBA

 

Einschränkungen durch Doppelbesteuerungs-abkommen (DBA) ergeben sich aus mehreren DBA-Bestimmungen, die im Regelfall nach der

 

Art der vermieteten Gegenstände differenzie-ren:

 

  • Unbewegliches Vermögen (Art. 6 OECD-MA): Die Besteuerung von Einkünften aus unbeweglichem Ver-mögen (Immobilien) erfolgt i.d.R. dort wo das vermietete Vermögen belegen ist (Belegenheitsprinzip). Was als un-bewegliches Vermögen zu qualifizieren ist, richtet sich im Regelfall nach dem Recht des Belegenheitsstaates (Art. 6 Abs. 2 S. 1 OECD-MA).

 

  • Rechte (Art. 12 OECD-MA): Einkünf-te aus zeitlich begrenzter Überlassung von Rechten führen meist zu Lizenz-gebühren im Sinne der DBA (vgl. Art. 12 Abs. 2 MA). Das Besteuerungsrecht wird regelmäßig – soweit nicht der Betriebsstättenvorbehalt gem. Art. 12 Abs. 3 OECD-MA greift – dem Wohnsitzstaat zugeordnet. Allerdings räumen viele deutsche DBA dem Quel-lenstaat ein der Höhe nach begrenztes Besteuerungsrecht (10%, allenfalls 15% der Lizenzeinnahmen) ein.

Exkurs: Erklärungspflicht bei unbe-schränkter Steuerpflicht

 

Unbeschränkt Steuerpflichtige sind nach § 25 Abs. 3 EStG, §§ 56 und 60 EStDV grundsätz-lich verpflichtet eine Steuererklärung abzuge-ben. Die Verpflichtung zur Abgabe der Steuer-erklärung entfällt u. a. wenn der Gesamtbetrag der Einkünfte (vor Abzug von Sonderausgaben und außergewöhnlichen Belastungen) den steuerlichen Grundfreibetrag von 8.354 € (bei Ehegatten16.708 €) nicht übersteigt oder wenn fast ausschließlich Einkünfte aus nicht selb-ständiger Arbeit erzielt werden, die dem Steu-erabzug unterlegen haben und bestimmte zu-sätzliche Voraussetzungen erfüllt sind.

 

 

  • Beschränkt steuerpflichtige Einkünfte aus Zinsen

 

Gemäß § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 5c und d EStG in Ver-bindung mit § 20 Abs. 1 Nr. 5 und 7 EStG un-terliegen bestimmte inländische Zinseinkünfte in Deutschland der beschränkten Steuerpflicht (Einkünfte aus Kapitalvermögen).

 

Gemäß § 20 Abs. 8 EStG (Subsidiaritätsklau-sel) können Zinseinkünfte mit gewerblichem Charakter als Einkünfte aus Gewerbebetrieb qualifiziert werden (bspw. Zinsen, die ein ge-werbliches Unternehmen für die Überlassung von Betriebskapital erhält). In diesen Fällen kann sich eine beschränkte Steuerpflicht aus § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 2 EStG ergeben.

 

Welche Kapitaleinkünfte als inländische Zins-einkünfte der beschränkten Steuerpflicht unter-liegen, normiert § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 5c EStG. Hierfür ist ein zusätzlicher sachlicher Inlands-bezug Voraussetzung:

 

Demnach unterliegen der beschränkten Steu-erpflicht Einkünfte aus Kapitalvermögen im Sinne des § 20 Abs. 1 Nr. 5 und 7 (Zinsein-künfte und sonstige Erträge), wenn

 

  • das Kapitalvermögen im Inland ding-lich besichert ist (Eintragung der Si-cherheit im Grundbuch oder Schiffsre-gister). Ausgenommen sind Zinsen aus Anleihen und Forderungen, die in ein öffentliches Schuldbuch eingetragen sind.

 

  • das Kapitalvermögen aus fremdkapital-ähnlichen Genussrechten besteht (Ge-nussrechten, mit denen nicht das Recht am Gewinn und am Liquidati-onserlös einer Kapitalgesellschaft ver-bunden ist).

 

Gemäß § 49 Abs. 1 Nr. 5d EStG unterliegen Zuflüsse für Tafelgeschäfte als Einkünfte aus Kapitalvermögen ebenfalls der beschränkten Steuerpflicht. Dies gilt jedoch nur dann, wenn die Kapitalerträge von einer inländischen Zahl-stelle ausgezahlt oder gutgeschrieben werden. Unter einer inländischen Zahlstelle ist auch ei-ne inländische Zweigstelle eines ausländischen Kreditinstituts, nicht aber eine ausländische Zweigstelle eines inländischen Kreditinstituts zu verstehen.

 

Zu den Einkünften aus Kapitalvermögen ge-hört auch der Gewinn aus der Veräußerung der Einkunftsquelle, etwa Zinsscheinen, Anteilen oder Aktien.

 

  1. a) Ermittlung der Einkünfte

 

Der Abzug von Werbungskosten ist seit dem Veranlagungszeitraum 2009 ausgeschlossen. Dies gilt sowohl für unbeschränkt als auch für beschränkt Steuerpflichtige. Der Sparer-Pauschbetrag in Höhe von 801 € wird grund-sätzlich auch beschränkt Steuerpflichtigen ge-währt (1.602 € bei gemeinsam veranlagten Ehegatten).

 

Die steuerpflichtigen Einkünfte aus Kapital-vermögen werden entweder mit dem Abgeltungsteuersatz von 25% (zzgl. Solidari-tätszuschlag) oder – auf Antrag des Steuer-pflichtigen (Günstigerprüfung) – mit dem indi-viduellen Steuersatz versteuert.

 

  1. b) Steuererhebung

 

Zinseinkünfte unterliegen dann dem Kapitalertragsteuerabzug gem. § 43 Abs. 1 Nr. 7 EStG, wenn Schuldner der Kapitalerträ-ge ein inländisches Kreditinstitut oder ein in-ländisches Finanzdienstleistungsinstitut ist. So-fern Kapitalertragsteuer (zu Recht) erhoben wurde, hat diese grundsätzlich abgeltende Wir-kung (§ 50 Abs. 2 S. 1 EStG). Ein Steuerabzug erfolgt in Höhe von 25% (zzgl. Solidaritätszu-schlag und ggf. Kirchensteuer). Soweit bei Zinseinkünften die Voraussetzungen für eine

 

 

beschränkte Steuerpflicht nicht vorliegen, d. h. es liegt keine im Inland dingliche Besicherung des Kapitalvermögens oder keine Tafelgeschäf-te vor, ist von der auszahlenden Stelle für diese Zinseinkünfte kein Einbehalt der Kapitaler-tragsteuer vorzunehmen.

 

Um einen (unberechtigten) Kapitalertragsteuer-einbehalt zu vermeiden, ist dem Kreditinstitut, das das Konto führt, rechtzeitig mitzuteilen, dass keine Kapitalertragsteuer einzubehalten ist. In der Regel muss dabei eine sogenannte Residenzbescheinigung vorgelegt werden, die von den Finanzbehörden des Wohnsitzstaates ausgestellt wird.

 

Sofern auf Zinseinkünfte, die in Deutschland der beschränkten Steuerpflicht unterliegen, keine Kapitalertragsteuer einbehalten wird, sind die Zinseinkünfte dennoch im Rahmen einer Steuererklärung anzugeben.

 

  1. c) Einschränkungen durch DBA

 

Die beschränkte Steuerpflicht der Einkünfte aus Kapitalvermögen wird durch DBA materi-ell-rechtlich weitgehend eingeschränkt (Auftei-lung Wohnsitzstaat und Quellenstaat). In den Abkommen wird üblicherweise zwischen Divi-denden und Zinsen unterschieden. Gemäß den Regelungen des Art. 10 Abs. 1 und Art. 11 Abs. 1 OECD-MA hat grundsätzlich der Wohnsitzstaat das Besteuerungsrecht. Dem Quellenstaat bleibt vorbehalten, eine der Höhe nach begrenzte Quellensteuer zu erheben. In den meisten (deutschen) Abkommen mit In-dustriestaaten ist bei Zinsen die Quellenbe-steuerung ganz ausgeschlossen. (Laut Art. 11 des DBA Deutschland-Thailand darf die auf Zinsen erhobene Quellensteuer 25% nicht übersteigen. Soweit eine Quellensteuer erhoben wird, ist gem. § 32d Abs. 5 EStG eine Anrech-nung auf eine etwaige deutsche Steuer mög-lich.)

 

 

 

 

Newsletter Nr. 64 (DE)

 

 

 

 

Schadensersatzrecht:

Rechtsvergleich Hongkong /Thailand /

 

Deutschland

 

 

 

 

November 2014

 

 

 

 

All rights reserved  Lorenz & Partners 2014

 

Obwohl Lorenz & Partners große Sorgfalt darauf verwenden, die in diesen Newslettern bereitge-stellten Informationen auf aktuellem Stand für Sie zur Verfügung zu stellen, möchten wir Sie da-rauf hinweisen, dass diese eine individuelle Beratung nicht ersetzen können. Lorenz & Partners übernimmt keinerlei Gewähr für die Aktualität, Korrektheit oder Vollständigkeit der bereitgestell-ten Informationen. Haftungsansprüche gegen Lorenz & Partners, welche sich auf Schäden materiel-ler oder ideeller Art beziehen, die durch die Nutzung oder Nichtnutzung der dargebotenen Informa-tionen bzw. durch die Nutzung fehlerhafter und unvollständiger Informationen verursacht wurden, sind grundsätzlich ausgeschlossen, sofern seitens Lorenz & Partners kein vorsätzliches oder grob fahrlässiges Verschulden vorliegt.

 

 

 

  1. Einführung

Besonders im internationalen Vertrags-recht ist die Schadensregulierung im Falle des Schadenseintritts eine wichtige Größe, die nicht selten den Ausschlag über den tatsächlichen Gewinn eines Geschäfts und dessen Abwicklung gibt.

 

Weltweit sind dabei die beiden maßgeb-lichen Ansätze des Common Law und des Civil Law hervorzuheben.

 

Das angelsächsische Recht des Com-mon Law ist überwiegend als „Recht des Einzelfalles“ (Case Law) mit Bindungs-wirkung für weitere Sachverhalte ähn-licher Art ausgestaltet. Nicht nur in Großbritannien und den USA, sondern auch im asiatischen Raum (z.B. Hong-kong) hat das Common Law aufgrund historischer Zusammenhänge überwie-genden Einzug in die lokalen Rechtssys-teme gehalten. Auf der anderen Seite steht das vorwiegend in Konti-nentaleuropa entwickelte kodifizierte Recht des Civil Law. Das kodifizierte Recht findet sich im Wesentlichen in den großen Rechtsordnungen Europas (außer Großbritannien und Irlands), in einigen Ländern des Orients, im latein-amerikanischen Raum sowie auch in Thailand, Japan, Taiwan und der Volks-republik China.

 

Im angelsächsischen Recht existieren viele verschiedene (typisierte) Schadens-ersatzarten. Der Zuspruch von Scha-densersatz erfolgt zumeist nicht allein

 

 

durch den Richter, sondern zum Teil auch durch eine aus Laien bestehende und deshalb oft unkalkulierbare Jury. Dagegen kennt zum Beispiel das deut-sche Recht im Wesentlichen nur den in § 249 BGB verankerten Grundsatz der Naturalrestitution. Dieser Grundsatz besagt, dass der gleiche wirtschaftliche Zustand herbeigeführt werden soll, der ohne das schädigende Ereignis bestehen würde, wobei die hypothetische Weiter-entwicklung des früheren Zustands zu berücksichtigen ist. Grundsätzlich be-deutet dies also, dass sowohl das negati-ve Interesse (Schadenswiedergutma-chung) als auch der entgangene Gewinn (positives Interesse) ersatzfähig sind. Problematisch ist jedoch, dass der Ge-schädigte seinen Schaden auch beweisen muss. Dies ist in Fällen des entgangenen Gewinns zumeist schwierig, da hier auf eine hypothetische Entwicklung abge-stellt werden muss.

 

Im internationalen Bereich haben sich weitestgehend die typisierten Schadens-ersatzformen des angelsächsischen Rechts durchgesetzt. Selbst das (ko-difizierte) UN-Kaufrecht (Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods = CISG), das für viele leis-tungsstarke Wirtschafts- und Ex-portnationen 1 mittlerweile Anwendung findet, sieht in den Art. 74 ff. CISG

1 z.B. USA, Deutschland, Frankreich, Italien, Schweiz, Österreich, China (PRC), Singapur, Australien, Neuseeland, Kanada, Russische Fö-deration, Schweden, Dänemark, Polen, Spanien, Mexiko, Argentinien; nicht: Hongkong, Thailand und Vietnam. ehrere Typisierungen vor (z.B. Kap-pungsgrenze des Art. 74; Schadens-berechnungsgrundsätze Art. 75f.). Dies lässt, zumindest auf den ersten Blick, eher eine Anlehnung an die angelsächsi-sche Vorgehensweise als an die abstrak-te Regelungsidee des kodifizierten Rechts erkennen.

 

  1. Vorteile des pauschalierten Schadensersatzes (Liquidated Damages)

Wie bereits betont, hat sich im interna-tionalen Vertragsrecht im Wesentlichen eine typisierende Vereinbarung hin-sichtlich des Eintritts und vor allem der Berechnung des Schadensersatzes durchgesetzt. Eine Klausel hinsichtlich pauschalierten Schadensersatzes (Liquidated Damages Clause) hat dabei den Vorteil, dass bereits im Vorfeld beide Vertragsparteien die im Fall des Scha-denseintritts entstehende Schadensfor-derung kennen.

 

In bestimmten Wirtschaftszweigen ist die tatsächliche Berechenbarkeit eines möglichen Schadensersatzes insbeson-dere für die Leistungserbringung „über-lebensnotwendig“. Die Ungewissheit, ob im Schadensfalle gegebenenfalls hor-rende Schadensersatzzahlungen auf den Leistungserbringer zukommen, kann ei-nen ordentlichen Geschäftsbetrieb ext-rem behindern bzw. unmöglich machen. Andererseits kann aber auch der Leis-tungsempfänger von einer pauschalier-ten Schadensersatzregelung profitieren. So bekommt er zum einen ein wirksa-mes Druckmittel an die Hand, welches die (rechtzeitige) Leistungserbringung gewährleisten kann, ohne den Ge-schäftsbetrieb des Leistungserbringers zu behindern. Andererseits kann im Fal-le des Schadenseintritts (zum Beispiel bei Verzugsschäden) bereits im Vorfeld

 

der zu erhaltende Schadensersatz quan-tifiziert werden.

Vor allem in der Baubranche, der schlüsselfertigen Erstellung von Anla-gen aller Art (internationaler Anlagen-bau, „Turnkey“-Projekte), aber auch im Arbeitsrecht (pauschalierte Abfindun-gen) und Franchiserecht (breach of busi-nessplan) hat sich der pauschalierte Scha-densersatz aufgrund dieser Vorteile durchgesetzt. Der pauschalierte Scha-densersatz ist damit gerade in Branchen, in denen aufgrund der höheren Wahr-scheinlichkeit eines Schadenseintritts ein Interesse der Vertragsparteien besteht, den Schadensersatz bereits im Vorfeld kalkulierbar zu machen, weit verbreitet. Durch kalkulierbare Beträge kann auch der Leistungserbringer wirkungsvoller zur best- und schnellstmöglichen Ver-tragserfüllung angehalten werden.

 

III. Wirksamkeitserfordernisse

 

Die Schadensersatzklausel, die in den jeweiligen (am besten ausschließlich in englischer Sprache abgefassten) Vertrag aufgenommen wird, muss gewisse

 

„Spielregeln“ erfüllen, um später nicht möglicherweise von einem lokalen Ge-richt, vor dem der pauschalierte Scha-densersatz eingeklagt wird, für unwirk-sam erklärt zu werden:

 

  1. Hongkong

 

Hongkong weist als ehemalige britische Kolonie eine Rechtsordnung auf, die durch das Common Law geprägt ist. Insbesondere im Common Law ist pein-lichst darauf zu achten, dass durch die gewählte Klausel keine Knebelungswir-kung eintritt. Eine solche Knebelungs-wirkung wird bei sogenannten „excessive amount clauses“ angenommen. Dies sind

 

Vereinbarungen, bei denen vorab eine sehr hohe Schadensersatzsumme fest-gesetzt wird, welche höchstwahrschein-lich weit über dem tatsächlichen Betrag eines eventuell eintretenden Schadens liegt. Nach angelsächsischem Recht hät-te eine solche Klausel Strafcharakter

 

(„punitive character“), was einer Vorabent-scheidung über die sogenannten „punitive damages“ gleichkäme, welche im angel-sächsischen Rechtsraum unzulässig ist, weil in diesem Punkt ausschließlich die Jury zur Entscheidung berufen ist (vgl. oben). Die vor allem in den USA ge-fürchteten „punitive damages“ entfalten aber für Hongkong keine durch-greifende Bedeutung. Strafzahlungen als Erziehungsinstrument sind eine aus-schließlich US-amerikanische Ausprä-gung, die dem britischen Rechtsdenken als solchem fremd ist.

 

  1. Thailand

 

In Thailand besteht grundsätzlich nicht die Gefahr, dass eine Vertragsklausel über die Vereinbarung eines pauschalier-ten Schadensersatzes insgesamt für un-wirksam erklärt wird. Vielmehr könnte hier lediglich eine aus Sicht des Gerichts notwendige Anpassung erfolgen. Zu-ständig für alle internationalen Verträge ist ein zentrales, mit solchen Rechtsfra-gen ausschließlich zu befassendes Ober-gericht in Bangkok (Central Intellectual Property & International Trade Court). Der „Unfair Contract Terms Act“ findet weder für die oben erwähnten häufigen Praxis-fälle im internationalen Anlagenbau, noch bei gewerblichen Lieferverträgen oder im Arbeitsrecht Anwendung, da dieser nach zutreffender Auffassung thailändischer Gerichte ausschließlich Konsumenten schützt.

 

  1. Deutschland

 

In Deutschland ist es ebenfalls grund-sätzlich möglich, international gängige Schadensersatzpauschalierungen zu ver-einbaren. Daneben kennt das deutsche Recht zusätzlich das spezialgesetzliche Instrument der Vertragsstrafe (§§ 339 ff. BGB), sowie das Abfindungsrecht (mit

 

steuerlichen Besonderheiten), welches im Arbeitsrecht durch Rechtsfortbil-dung und Rechtsprechung entstanden ist. Trotz dieses vorhandenen eigenen Systems der Vertragsstrafen ist die Ver-einbarung international gängiger Scha-densersatzklauseln auch in Deutschland vorteilhaft, da so eine Konformität der weltweiten Unternehmungen mit ent-sprechender Kalkulationssicherheit (vgl. oben) und zentral gesteuertem Risiko-management besteht. Für das deutsche Gerichtswesen ist zu beachten, dass der BGH als oberstes deutsches Zivilgericht (BGH 131, 356, zuvor auch in BGH RR 2000, 719) ausnahmsweise der engli-schen Rechtsauffassung folgte und ex-zessive individuell vereinbarte Scha-denspauschalierungen insgesamt für unwirksam erklärt hat, mit der Folge, dass dann die Geltendmachung eines Ersatzanspruchs auf einer solchen Grundlage vor deutschen Gerichten zur Gänze zum Scheitern verurteilt ist. Eine pauschalierte Vereinbarung in Allgemei-nen Geschäftsbedingungen unterliegt regelmäßig den strengen Voraussetzun-gen des § 309 Nr. 5 BGB. So muss dem Schadensersatzpflichtigen z.B. der Nachweis gestattet werden, dass entwe-der ein Schaden nicht eingetreten ist oder der tatsächliche Schaden geringer ist als der pauschalierte. Auch darf die Pauschale nicht den gewöhnlich zu er-wartenden Schaden übersteigen.

 

  1. Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten

Grundsätzlich können gemäß den Ge-setzen von Hongkong, Thailand und Deutschland pauschalierte Schadenser-satzzahlungen in jeweiligen Scha-densklauseln individualvertraglich ver-einbart werden, jedoch sollte von einer vorgefertigten Vereinbarung im AGB-Stil oder durch Vertragsannex Abstand genommen werden. Diese Vorgehens-weise würde z.B. nach deutschem Recht eine Inhaltskontrolle nach AGB-Recht auslösen, was zu einer Anwendung des § 309 Nr. 5 BGB führen würde, welcher die Möglichkeiten des pauschalierten Schadensersatzes erheblich einschränkt. Selbst wenn ein Verbraucher nicht am Vertrag beteiligt ist, wäre die Wertung des § 309 Nr. 5 BGB über § 307 BGB zu berücksichtigen. Als sog. „General-norm“ sieht diese Vorschrift vor, dass Bestimmungen in Allgemeinen Ge-schäftsbedingungen unwirksam sind, wenn sie den Vertragspartner des Ver-wenders entgegen den Geboten von Treu und Glauben unangemessen be-nachteiligen. Eine solche Benachtei-ligung ist im Zweifel anzunehmen, wenn eine Bestimmung mit wesentlichen Grundgedanken der gesetzlichen Rege-lung, von der abgewichen wird, nicht zu vereinbaren ist oder wenn sie wesentli-che Rechte oder Pflichten, die sich aus der Natur des Vertrags ergeben, so ein-schränkt, dass die Erreichung des Ver-tragszwecks gefährdet ist. Vorzugswür-dig ist die im internationalen Rechtsver-kehr vorherrschende Praxis, Pauschalie-rungsklauseln als integralen Vertragsbe-standteil anhand der jeweiligen individu-ellen Parteivorgaben auszuhandeln.

 

  1. Hongkong

Im Hongkonger Recht ist die Heranzie-hung gängiger Pauschalierungsklauseln zu empfehlen, welche im internationalen (englischen) Rechtsverkehr häufig ver-wendet und am besten von Anwälten den individuellen Bedürfnissen der je-weiligen Vertragspartner angepasst wer-den. Da diese Klauseln im Geschäfts-verkehr erprobt sind, besteht keine Ge-fahr, sich der in unzähligen Präzedenz-fällen des gesamten englischen Rechts-raumes entwickelten Kasuistik auszulie-fern. Zwar sind so die Gestaltungsspiel-räume etwas eingeschränkt, dennoch sollte man der Rechtssicherheit Priorität vor im Einzelfall vielleicht verführeri-

 

schen Ausgestaltungen einräumen, wel-che dann vor Gericht keinen Bestand haben. Zudem ist zu beachten, dass die Klauseln als solche hinreichend be-stimmt sind und keinen (auch nicht im Entferntesten konstruierbaren) Strafcha-rakter haben.

 

  1. Thailand

 

In Thailand besteht ein größerer Gestal-tungsspielraum. Die Gefahr einer ge-richtlichen Feststellung der Unwirksam-keit der Klausel droht hier kaum. Es kann lediglich eine (möglichst zu ver-meidende) Anpassung betreffend der Höhe des Schadensersatzes eintreten. In wichtigen Geschäftsbereichen, wie dem Anlagenbau, wie auch bei der Ausgestal-tung von Arbeitsverträgen von interna-tionalen Führungskräften sollte aber auch hier im Wesentlichen auf die inter-national gängigen Klauseln zu-rückgegriffen werden. Auch hier gilt, dass eine einheitliche und zentrale Steu-erung das gesamte Risikomanagement erleichtert und beim ausländischen Ver-tragspartner als Vorteil der Vorlage und Verwendung vertrauter Regelungsstruk-turen verbucht werden kann.

 

  1. Deutschland

 

Nach deutschem Recht können einer-seits pauschalierte Schadensersatzzah-lungen vereinbart werden, welche den nicht zu vernachlässigenden Vorteil ha-ben, dass sie dem meist erkennbaren In-teresse der ausländischen Vertragspart-ner an einer vertrauten und international einheitlichen Regelung entsprechen. Stattdessen kann aber auch unter Bezug-nahme auf die §§ 339 ff. BGB der Weg einer gesetzlich geregelten Ausges-taltung in Form von Vertragsstrafen gewählt werden. Im Arbeitsrecht (auch bei Führungskräften) besteht (aus Sicht des Arbeitgebers) gegebenenfalls ein Vorteil der Anwendung gebräuchlicher deutscher Regelungen. Hier führt die Vornahme einer Pauschalierung nach in-ternationalem Vorbild oftmals (aus Sicht des Arbeitgebers) zu schlechteren Er-gebnissen. Auch beschleunigt die Ver-wendung der deutschen Regelungen die Durchsetzung des Rechts vor deutschen Gerichten. So kommt es aufgrund des Zeitmoments zu für den Arbeitgeber oftmals noch günstigeren Ergebnissen. Allerdings bergen Vertragsstrafen nach deutschem Recht auch die Gefahr, dass sie von Common-Law-Gerichten unter Umständen als „punitive damages clauses“ angesehen werden, mit der Folge, dass sie für unwirksam erklärt werden. Diese Gefahr wächst mit der Höhe der ver-einbarten Vertragsstrafe.

 

Trotz dieses gewissen Restrisikos kann diese Art der Vertragsausgestaltung mit dem Vorteil weit geringerer Abfin-dungszahlungen im Arbeitsrecht aus-nahmsweise der rechtssichereren Ausge-staltung durch Vereinbarung pauscha-lierter Schadensersatzzahlungen vorge-zogen werden. Die gewisse Rechtsunsi-cherheit kann gegebenenfalls in Kauf genommen werden.

 

 

Oftmals wird auch aus Gründen kultu-reller Missverständnisse auf die direkte Regelung eines pauschalierten Scha-densersatzes verzichtet. Aber insbeson-dere in Branchen, in denen das Zeit-moment von besonderer Wichtigkeit ist und eine vergleichsweise hohe Scha-denswahrscheinlichkeit vorherrscht, sollten bereits im Vorfeld alle notwen-digen Regelungen gerichts- und länder-fest vorgenommen werden. Der auslän-dische Vertragspartner wird dies verste-hen, da letztendlich beide Seiten davon profitieren. Das Gelingen des Geschäfts und dessen zufriedenstellende Abwick-lung hängen auch in geographisch und kulturell zunächst fremden Umgebun-gen entscheidend von den vertraglichen Regelungen ab.

 

 

  1. Abschließende Bewertung

Die Vereinbarung eines pauschalierten Schadensersatzes unter Verwendung von aus dem englischen Recht über-nommenen internationalen Vertrags-rechtsklauseln ist auch für Unterneh-mungen in Hongkong und Thailand ei-ne wichtige Hilfe zur Steuerung des weltweiten Risikomanagements. Insbe-sondere im Anlagenbau, der Baubranche und nicht zuletzt im Arbeitsrecht stellt eine dementsprechende professionelle Ausgestaltung der einzelnen Verträge ein unerlässliches Hilfsmittel dar, um in diesen Ländern erfolgreiche Geschäfte zu machen und beim Vertragspartner die Grundlagen vertrauensvoller und ef-fizienter Zusammenarbeit zu setzen.

 

Ländervergleich zum

vereinbarter pau-

vereinbarter pau-

Straf- oder „pu-

 

schalierter Schadens-

nitiver“ Scha-

 

Schadensersatz

schalierter Scha-

ersatz in exzessiver

densersatz

 

 

densersatz

 

Höhe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

möglich, teilweise je-

Vereinbarung

 

 

 

möglich, aber

 

Deutschland

möglich

doch durch BGH für

nicht horrend

 

 

 

unwirksam erklärt

 

 

(Vertragsstrafen)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hongkong

gängig

unwirksam

unüblich

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thailand

gängig

zu vermeiden

unüblich

 

 

 

 

 

 

Großbritannien

gängig

unwirksam

unüblich

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nicht vertraglich

 

 

 

 

vereinbar, aber

 

USA

gängig

unwirksam

durch die Jury

 

 

 

 

möglich und ggf.

 

 

 

 

horrend

 

 

 

 

 

 

Singapur

wie HKG

wie HKG

wie HKG

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia

wie HKG

wie HKG

wie HKG